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Article

An Evaluation of the Approaches Used by Graduates in Job Search, Ghana

1Department of Liberal Studies, Koforidua Polytechnic, Koforidua, Eastern Region


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014, 2(1), 36-43
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Prince Adjei, Jamal Mohammed. An Evaluation of the Approaches Used by Graduates in Job Search, Ghana. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014; 2(1):36-43. doi: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-5.

Correspondence to: Jamal  Mohammed, Department of Liberal Studies, Koforidua Polytechnic, Koforidua, Eastern Region. Email: nakohinaa@gmail.com

Abstract

The study, evaluation of the approaches used by graduates in job search in Ghana, employed an exploratory design approach by surveying both employed and unemployed graduates using a questionnaire. A total of 132 employed graduates and 128 unemployed graduates were reached for the study.The findings of the study revealed that both the employed and unemployed graduates consider use of application letters, personal contacts, references and networking to be an effective means in gaining job employment. Majority of the respondents indicated that, the response rate of companies to the use of the above mentioned methods of job search was very high and encouraging. Majority of the respondents indicated that they received responses from about five companies offering them a chance of dialogue about the possibility of handing them employment. Most of the employed graduates expressed their desire to recommend it and also to re-use them should the need to change job arise. The extent of their belief in the use of these methods of job search is that using them in job search can guarantee a favourable outcome of finding a job within one year.The study recommends among others that organisations should ease the requirements used as criteria for qualification for employment so that more graduates can be offered work. Also, it is suggested that graduates should be more confident and persistent in their job search, exploring more other job search options to secure themselves work. In addition, the researchers advise that HR experts and managers should build their recruitment and selection strategies around advert and the use of websites and social media.

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References

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Article

Subprime Mortgage Delinquency and Default Rates by Metropolitan Area: An Analysis by Origination Vintages and Projections for 2007

1Professor of Finance, School of Management, George Mason University


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014, 2(1), 24-35
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Gerald A. Hanweck. Subprime Mortgage Delinquency and Default Rates by Metropolitan Area: An Analysis by Origination Vintages and Projections for 2007. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014; 2(1):24-35. doi: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-4.

Correspondence to: Gerald  A. Hanweck, Professor of Finance, School of Management, George Mason University. Email: ghanweck@gmu.edu

Abstract

Subprime mortgage default rates have led to a crisis in the residential mortgage markets unprecedented since the Great Depression. Information reported on these defaults has demonstrated that they vary by location and region. To properly understand the causes of such high rates of mortgage defaults, we undertook this study. It reports on a cross-section analysis of default rates of residential, subprime and Alt-A mortgages aggregated to the metropolitan areas (MSA) level. The hypotheses tested here represent the effects of loan and borrower level characteristics and MSA economic factors, such as MSA employment growth, unemployment rate, household income and housing price changes and their volatility on the level of default rates on subprime mortgages. We test these by origination vintage for 2005 and 2006 and project default rates by MSA into 2007 using 2006 vintage estimated parameters. We find that loan and borrower level characteristics such as loan-to-value ratio weighted by original loan balances, the weighted proportion of loans that have no documentation or the borrowers’ weighted FICO score and MSA economic factors of housing price changes and employment growth are highly statistically significant and economically important in explaining MSA subpirme residential mortgage default rates over the 359 MSAs for 2005 and 2006 vintages. The data used are from Loan Performance data base for 6 million subprime loans separated into 2005 and 2006 vintages, the OFHEO (now FHFA) Housing Price Index and household employment Dept. of Labor. Projections of housing price changes and employment growth for each MSA were used based on a linear extrapolation of the past 9 months of 2006 and the first 3 months of 2007. The main finding is that the projected default rates for all of 2007 are larger than those of 2005 and 2006 on average.

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References

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Article

An Industry Perspective on the Pork Meat Processing of CALIXTRA’S Food Products1

1BS Agribusiness Economics, School of Management, University of the Philippines Mindanao, Davao City, Philippines


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014, 2(1), 17-23
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Alexander Ken P. Libranza, Kathlene A. Aparece, Renee Grace S. Tila. An Industry Perspective on the Pork Meat Processing of CALIXTRA’S Food Products1. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014; 2(1):17-23. doi: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-3.

Correspondence to: Alexander  Ken P. Libranza, BS Agribusiness Economics, School of Management, University of the Philippines Mindanao, Davao City, Philippines. Email: alexanderlibranza@yahoo.com

Abstract

The Philippines’ food processing sector is the most dominant manufacturing sector in the country. This study aims to understand and evaluate the different factors which affects the pork meat processing of Calixtra’s Food Products, and to incorporate the determined factors in creating an industry perspective of the pork meat processing industrythat would serve as a guide to those who wants to venture in this type of business. Based on the results of the study, the researchers observed that the main problems faced by the industry are the seasonality, advertising, and storage of the products. For small-scale processors, advertising is not that important. They mainly rely on the creation ofpatrons and established consumers. The researchers recommended that the processors should be located near the city with diversified products to cope with the very high competition in the market.

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References

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[[4]  Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. (2010, October). Retrieved August 28, 2013, from Consumer Trends: Pork in the Philippines: http://www.ats-sea.agr.gc.ca/ase/5615-eng.htm
 
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[6]  An Overview of the Philippine Food Market. (2012, August 27). Retrieved August 28, 2013, from Agricultue and Agri-food Canada: http://www.ats-sea.agr.gc.ca/ase/6225-eng.htm
 
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Article

Currency Crisis in Bangladesh Economy: Some Insights

1Associate Professor, Department of Economics, North South University

2Reshman Hasan, Department of Economics, North South University


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014, 2(1), 7-16
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
A. F. M. Ataur Rahman, Reshman Hasan. Currency Crisis in Bangladesh Economy: Some Insights. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014; 2(1):7-16. doi: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: A.  F. M. Ataur Rahman, Associate Professor, Department of Economics, North South University. Email: ataur19@yahoo.com

Abstract

Many countries around the world have faced currency crisis where they experienced substantial devaluation of local currency vis-à-vis some strong international currency within a short span of time resulting disruption in nominal as well as real activities. Although Bangladesh is not one of them yet in an integrated world possibility of experiencing such crisis is not remote. Using the concept of Exchange Market Pressure (EMP) in this paper we have tried to measure pressure on exchange rate in Bangladesh and then tried to find an early warning indicator of building EMP for Bangladesh. We found that in some occasions exchange rate situations got little erratic but never to the extent of crisis. We also found that before building up exchange rate pressure current account is most probably to show an early warning for Bangladesh. And ratio of M2 and reserve actually moves along with EMP index, so it may not be too informative for identifying currency crisis beforehand.

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References

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Article

Aristotle and the Tensions between Politics and Economy

1Universidad de Buenos Aires (Instituto de Investigaciones Gino Germani), CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council), Buenos Aires, Argentina


Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014, 2(1), 1-6
DOI: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Hernán Borisonik. Aristotle and the Tensions between Politics and Economy. Journal of Finance and Economics. 2014; 2(1):1-6. doi: 10.12691/jfe-2-1-1.

Correspondence to: Hernán  Borisonik, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Instituto de Investigaciones Gino Germani), CONICET (National Scientific and Technical Research Council), Buenos Aires, Argentina. Email: hborisonik@sociales.uba.ar

Abstract

As presented by Georgio Agamben, the notion of sacer (sacred) appears to be an unavoidable element to analyze the structure of occidental political thought from its very beginning up to the present time. Such interpretation throws new ideas on an essential question: the relationship between politics and economy in Aristotle, the one who had the most complete political project of the ancient world. In that sense, money has a privileged place to deepen Aristotle’s thought. As much in the critique of accumulation and the usury that takes place in his analysis of chrematistics (Politics 1256b-1258a) as well as in the need to consecrate ill-gotten gains in democracies (Politics 1320a), it is clear that money appears in crucial points for defining the relationship between sacred and profane, between politics and the economy. The attempt of this communication will be, then, to make a concrete study of the Aristotelian passages previously mentioned along with commentary on some complementary notes taken from the Nicomaquean Ethics and the Constitution of Athens and to integrate them with Agamben’s explanation of the Homo Sacer. For that reason, categories as ‘sacred’, ‘use’, and ‘exclusion’ will be fundamental for this study.

Keywords

References

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[[1]  AGAMBEN, G. Homo Sacer I. Sovereign Power and Bare Life. Stanford University Press. 1998.
 
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[[4]  ARISTOTLE. Nicomachean Ethics. The Complete Works of Aristotle. Vol. 2. Ed. Jonathan Barnes. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1991.
 
[[5]  POLANYI, K. “Aristotle discovers the economy”. In Polanyi, Arensberg & Pearson (Eds.). Trade and market in the early empires: economies in history and theory. The Free Press. Glencoe, 1957.
 
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[6]  ARISTOTLE. Politics. The Complete Works of Aristotle. Vol. 2. Ed. Jonathan Barnes. Princeton, Princeton University Press, 1991.
 
[7]  AGAMBEN, G. Profanazioni. Nottetempo. Roma, 2005.
 
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