Journal of Environment Pollution and Human Health
ISSN (Print): 2334-3397 ISSN (Online): 2334-3494 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jephh Editor-in-chief: Dibyendu Banerjee
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Journal of Environment Pollution and Human Health. 2016, 4(4), 78-82
DOI: 10.12691/jephh-4-4-1
Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of the Gross Alpha and Beta Radioactivity Concentration in Some Agricultural Products (Vegetables and Fruits) Obtained in Two Oil Fields in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria

Alao A.Adewumi1,

1Department of Physics, Federal College of Education (Tech) Omoku, Rivers State, Nigeria

Pub. Date: October 27, 2016

Cite this paper:
Alao A.Adewumi. Evaluation of the Gross Alpha and Beta Radioactivity Concentration in Some Agricultural Products (Vegetables and Fruits) Obtained in Two Oil Fields in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria. Journal of Environment Pollution and Human Health. 2016; 4(4):78-82. doi: 10.12691/jephh-4-4-1

Abstract

The gross alpha and beta radionuclide activity concentration in two agricultural products(vegetables and fruits) obtained in selected oil fields within the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria have been studied and evaluated. Vegetables and fruits samples were harvested, collected and analysed for gross alpha and beta activity using an IN-20 model gas-flow proportional counter. The results obtained showed that the average gross alpha and beta activity for vegetables samples ranged from 0.303±0.039 Bg-1 to 0.482±0.041 Bqg-1 and 0.069±0.055 to 0.880±0.053 Bq/g respectively, while the average gross alpha and beta activity for fruit samples ranged from BDL to 0.561±0.41 Bq/g and 0.164±0.061 to 0.693±0.056 Bq/g respectively. These results revealed an elevation over the activity of the control samples taken from non-oil bearing environment and the World Health Organization standard limit of 0.1Bq/g for gross alpha activity but the average beta activity were all below the WHO standard limit of 1.0 Bq/g in all the zones studied. The elevation recorded may be due to oil exploration activities with associated artificial or anthropogenic activities such as gas flare, pollutants, transportation by air media to plant surfaces, frequent oil spillage into and back to the soil or any accidental underground pollutants into the food chain encountered in the surveyed areas. However, the results so obtained may not pose any serious detrimental health side-effects to the public consuming these products.

Keywords:
Gross Alpha and Beta Radioactivity Oil fields Agricultural products

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