Journal of Business and Management Sciences
ISSN (Print): 2333-4495 ISSN (Online): 2333-4533 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/jbms Editor-in-chief: Heap-Yih Chong
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Journal of Business and Management Sciences. 2016, 4(1), 12-19
DOI: 10.12691/jbms-4-1-3
Open AccessArticle

Calls to Change: Embedded Career Planning Process (CPP) into Accounting Programme

Adel Ahmed1,

1Department of Accounting and Finance & Banking, College of Business Administration, Al Ain University of Science and Technology, UAE

Pub. Date: February 27, 2016

Cite this paper:
Adel Ahmed. Calls to Change: Embedded Career Planning Process (CPP) into Accounting Programme. Journal of Business and Management Sciences. 2016; 4(1):12-19. doi: 10.12691/jbms-4-1-3

Abstract

In today’s business environment, academic qualifications are not enough. There is an increasing need for people who have a wide range of skills as well as professional or technical competence. Organisations need multi-skilled people and flexible project teams that can be put together to accomplish the moving tasks in the new world of work. So although technical and professional skills are as important as ever, organisations are now also seeking people with an array of employability or soft skills - people who can manage themselves, can work effectively with colleagues and customers, who can think creatively and can take responsibility. A few years ago, in response to a call from some academic and professional groups, accounting curriculums across the country were revised to include instructions aimed at improving students’ knowledge, skills, and competences which would go beyond their technical knowledge. These skills included, communication skills, analytical skills, presentation skills, team orientation, critical thinking, to name only a few. This paper is conceptual study to explore embedding the career Planning process (CPP) into accounting programme. The paper concludes that CPP is a structured and supported process undertaken by an individual to reflect upon their own learning, performance and/or achievement and to plan for their personal, educational and career development. CPP cover generic skills which everyone needs to be a fully rounded and well educated person, regardless of academic subject. CPP’ skills include Written, Oral and Visual Communication Skills, Information Skills, research skills, Working with Others, IT Skills, Working with Numbers, Solving Problems and Improving your own Learning and Performance. CPP’ skills - as generic skills - will be needed in the employment after university in addition to the specialist knowledge. By developing these skills now, the students can help make the transition to employment more smoothly later on.

Keywords:
accounting education- career planning

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