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Article

Socio-Economic Determinants of Growth of Rural Entrepreneurship in Sonitpur Distric of Assam- an Emprical Study

1Department of Commerce Assam University, Diphu campus


Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014, 2(1), 26-34
DOI: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Dipanjan Chakraborty. Socio-Economic Determinants of Growth of Rural Entrepreneurship in Sonitpur Distric of Assam- an Emprical Study. Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014; 2(1):26-34. doi: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-4.

Correspondence to: Dipanjan  Chakraborty, Department of Commerce Assam University, Diphu campus. Email: rborman62@gmail.com

Abstract

India is the fastest growing economy of the world but still there is a large area of darkness in the rural hinterland. Over 70% percent of our population lives in Villages areas and majority of people depend on agriculture for their livelihood. The pace of industrialization in Assam is slow and tardy. Thus, there is need to strengthen employment opportunities in the rural areas by promoting rural entrepreneurship. The present descriptive study is made in the Sonitpur district of Assam based on data collected from 288 rural entrepreneurs through structured schedule. The study analyses the impact of socio-economic background on growth of rural entrepreneurship. It was found that age, gender, qualification; annual income etc of rural entrepreneurs had a direct impact on the growth of rural entrepreneurship. The findings of the study suggest that there is a need for concerted efforts by the government and rural masses to enhance the growth of rural enterprises.

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References

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Article

Significance of Innovation in Business Process of Value Chain

1Principal Scientist and Head Agribusiness Management Division, National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (NAARM), Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh

2Research Associate, Agribusiness Management Division, National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (NAARM), Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh


Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014, 2(1), 18-25
DOI: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
G.P. Reddy, Vijayachandra Reddy.S.. Significance of Innovation in Business Process of Value Chain. Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014; 2(1):18-25. doi: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-3.

Correspondence to: Vijayachandra  Reddy.S., Research Associate, Agribusiness Management Division, National Academy of Agricultural Research Management (NAARM), Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh. Email: vjay.economics@gmail

Abstract

This article constructs a speculative framework to explain significance of Innovation in business value chains. It draws on three streams of literature – need, significance and developing innovation capabilities in order to identify three important variables which contribute a greater role in influential how value chains are directed and changed accordingly to the Innovation process in business world. These are: (1) Need of Innovation to Energize, Growth and Profit, and Survival of firms (2) Significance of innovation in Business Process, and (3) Development of Innovation Capabilities. Thus, the article highlights the concept of value and it’s progress as value chain then it focus on the needs and importance of value chain triggered by innovation. It also helps to integrate small firms and corporate sector and establish a link between small firms and international markets through effective value chain system. In addition, it describes the value chain innovation capabilities and roles of various dimensions in the innovation. So that innovation in the business process can facilitate appropriate participation of the small and corporate sector firms through suitable policy framework.

Keywords

References

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Article

Financial Liberalization and Stock Market Behaviour in Emerging Countries

1URED, FSEGS, Sfax, Tunisia


Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014, 2(1), 8-17
DOI: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mnif Trabelsi Afef. Financial Liberalization and Stock Market Behaviour in Emerging Countries. Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014; 2(1):8-17. doi: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: Mnif  Trabelsi Afef, URED, FSEGS, Sfax, Tunisia. Email: mnifafef@gmail.com

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze the behaviour of the stock market cycles in emerging countries in the region of Latin America (Argentina, Brazil, Chile Colombia and Mexico) and Asia (Philippines, Korea, Taiwan and Thailand) and we compare their characteristics with those of the United States between 1975 and 2005. We make a distinction between the pre and post-financial reform periods to study the effects of financial liberalization over time. We use the uni and multivariate unobserved components structural time series models. We find that the amplitude and volatility of American Latin countries have declined substantially after the date of financial liberalization to achieve less than those detected during the financial repression. The cycle’s synchronization with the United States has also grown considerably to around 70%. For the Asian countries, the positive effects of financial liberalization on the cyclical characteristics are not yet clear in medium term. The amplitude and volatility cycles of the Asian countries have been strengthened following the implementation of financial liberalization. But in recent years, there is a downward trend in the amplitude and volatility with improved synchronization of market cycles with those of the United States.

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References

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Article

Real Output Effects of Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria

1Department of Economics, University of Lagos, Nigeria

2Department of Economics, Obafemi Awolowo University, Ile-Ife, Nigeria


Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014, 2(1), 1-7
DOI: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-1
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Saibu Olufemi M, Keke Ndidi. Agnes. Real Output Effects of Foreign Direct Investment in Nigeria. Journal of Behavioural Economics, Finance, Entrepreneurship, Accounting and Transport. 2014; 2(1):1-7. doi: 10.12691/jbe-2-1-1.

Correspondence to: Saibu  Olufemi M, Department of Economics, University of Lagos, Nigeria. Email: omosaibu@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study examined the impact of Foreign Private Investment on economic growth using annual time series data from Nigerian economy. Cointegration and Error Correction Mechanism (ECM) techniques were employed to empirically analyze the relationship between foreign private investment and economic growth and to draw policy inferences on the observed relationship. The result revealed that there was a substantial feedback of 116% and 78% from previous disequilibria between long-run economic growth and foreign private investment respectively. The findings also indicated that a substantial proportion of capital inflow were not productively invested however the relatively small proportion (22%) of net capital inflows invested, contributed significantly to economic growth in the Nigerian economy. The political environment was found to be unfavorable and overwhelmed the positive impact of foreign private investment. The paper concluded that there is high prospect for foreign private investment to boost economic growth if conducive environment, such as: political and macroeconomic stability are provided in Nigeria.

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References

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