International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research
ISSN (Print): 2333-1135 ISSN (Online): 2333-1259 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ijdsr Editor-in-chief: Marcos Roberto Tovani Palone
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International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research. 2017, 5(6), 141-145
DOI: 10.12691/ijdsr-5-6-2
Open AccessArticle

Prevalence and Incidence of Orofacial Cleft Anomalies in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Associated with Etiological Deformities in Hail Region, Saudi Arabia

Abdullah Faraj AlShammari1, Dalal Habib AlShammary1, Hasna Rasheed Alshubrmi1, Ebtsam Abdullah Aledaili2, Hazza Abdullah Alhobeira1 and Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed3,

1College of Dentistry, University of Hail, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA)

2Ministry of Health, University of Hail

3College of Medicine, University of Hail

Pub. Date: December 29, 2017

Cite this paper:
Abdullah Faraj AlShammari, Dalal Habib AlShammary, Hasna Rasheed Alshubrmi, Ebtsam Abdullah Aledaili, Hazza Abdullah Alhobeira and Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed. Prevalence and Incidence of Orofacial Cleft Anomalies in Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Associated with Etiological Deformities in Hail Region, Saudi Arabia. International Journal of Dental Sciences and Research. 2017; 5(6):141-145. doi: 10.12691/ijdsr-5-6-2

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to explore the prevalence, incidence and possible etiological risk factors of orofacial cleft in Hail Region, Northern Saudi Arabia. Methodology: This is a retrospective study conducted in Maternity Hospital, Hail, Saudi Arabia. Data of seven years (2011-2017) records of newborn infants were reviewed for the presence of orofacial anomalies (included 27800 files). Results: The overall prevalence rate of orofacial cleft was 1.08 per 1000 births. Out of 30 patients diagnosed with orofacial anomalies, 14(46.7%) were found with cleft palate, 11(36.7%) with bilateral cleft lip and palate, 4(13.3%) with bilateral cleft lip and only one (3.3%) with unilateral cleft lip and palate. Conclusion: The prevalence of orofacial clefts in Northern Saudi Arabia was similar or slightly lower than the higher global reported rates. Cleft palate was the most common type of orofacial cleft in Northern Saudi Arabia.

Keywords:
orofacial cleft cleft palate cleft lip orofacial anomalies Saudi Arabia

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