International Journal of Celiac Disease
ISSN (Print): 2334-3427 ISSN (Online): 2334-3486 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ijcd Editor-in-chief: Samasca Gabriel
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International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2016, 4(2), 64-67
DOI: 10.12691/ijcd-4-2-3
Open AccessReview Article

Psychological Aspects in Celiac Disease: Step by Step from Symptoms to Daily Life with Celiac Disease

Julie Melicharova1, Michal Slavik2 and Monika Cervinkova1, 3,

1Department of Psychology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic

2Department of Education, Faculty of Education, University of J. E. Purkyne, Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic

3Department of Surgery, 1st Medical Faculty, Charles University and Hospital Na Bulovce, Prague, Czech Republic;Laboratory of Tumour Biology, Institute of Animal Physiology and Genetics of the Czech Academy of Sciences, v.v.i., Libechov, Czech Republic

Pub. Date: May 28, 2016

Cite this paper:
Julie Melicharova, Michal Slavik and Monika Cervinkova. Psychological Aspects in Celiac Disease: Step by Step from Symptoms to Daily Life with Celiac Disease. International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2016; 4(2):64-67. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-4-2-3

Abstract

Celiac disease (CD) is a worldwide disease with continuously increasing incidence particularly in Western countries. It is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory disease. Combination of genetic (HLA antigens) and environmental (gluten) factors is known to be responsible for disease development. Despite intensive research in the field of CD the only to date known option of treatment is gluten free diet (GFD). That means for patient complying with lifestyle changes. We found out that despite there are published many papers concerning CD, only a few of them are focused on psychological aspects of disease. In our opinion it is underestimated field, because up to now GFD is only possible option of treatment causing significant limitations in patient’s daily life and thus affecting quality of live (QoL). Knowledge of psychological aspects and possible following interventions can improve acceptance and compliance concerning GFD. We found out that sufficient communication and providing adequate information seems to be one of the most important factors. Information should be provided in appropriate quantity and quality. Knowledge of psychological aspects can be helpful just in that respect. Surprisingly, there are practically missing publications concerning psychological aspects in relation to serious possible complication of CD such as infertility or risk of some cancers. Also there is a lack of publications dealing with diagnostic procedures themselves. We mean that also this area is underestimated, because diagnostic procedures can be also a source of negative feelings as some of them are invasive and painful.

Keywords:
celiac disease gluten-free diet psychological aspects experiencing

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