International Journal of Celiac Disease
ISSN (Print): 2334-3427 ISSN (Online): 2334-3486 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ijcd Editor-in-chief: Samasca Gabriel
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International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2015, 3(2), 75-76
DOI: 10.12691/ijcd-3-2-2
Open AccessArticle

Potential Role of Bordetella Pertussis in Celiac Disease

Keith Rubin1 and Steven Glazer1,

1ILiAD Biotechnologies LLC, New York City, 10003 United States of America

Pub. Date: March 27, 2015

Cite this paper:
Keith Rubin and Steven Glazer. Potential Role of Bordetella Pertussis in Celiac Disease. International Journal of Celiac Disease. 2015; 3(2):75-76. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-3-2-2

Abstract

We discuss the correlation between the incidence of acute clinical Bordetella pertussis infection and celiac disease in children < 2 years of age during the Swedish celiac disease epidemic of the 1980s and 1990s.

Keywords:
celiac disease Bordetella pertussis subclinical Bordetella pertussis colonization (SCBPC)

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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