American Journal of Environmental Protection
ISSN (Print): 2328-7241 ISSN (Online): 2328-7233 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/env Editor-in-chief: Mohsen Saeedi, Hyo Choi
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American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2014, 2(5), 89-94
DOI: 10.12691/env-2-5-3
Open AccessArticle

Productivity of Wheat (Triticum Aestivum) as Intercrop in Grewia Optiva Based Traditional Agroforestry System along Altitudinal Gradient and Aspect in Mid Hills of Garhwal Himalaya, India

Arvind Bijalwan1, and Manmohan J. R. Dobriyal2

1Indian Institute of Forest management (IIFM) Nehru Nagar, Bhopal-462 003, M.P., India

2Department of Silviculture and Agroforestry ASPEE College of Horticulture and Forestry Navsari Agricultural University, Navsari - 396 450, Gujarat, India

Pub. Date: October 23, 2014

Cite this paper:
Arvind Bijalwan and Manmohan J. R. Dobriyal. Productivity of Wheat (Triticum Aestivum) as Intercrop in Grewia Optiva Based Traditional Agroforestry System along Altitudinal Gradient and Aspect in Mid Hills of Garhwal Himalaya, India. American Journal of Environmental Protection. 2014; 2(5):89-94. doi: 10.12691/env-2-5-3

Abstract

Grewia optiva, wonder tree of western Himalaya locally known as Bhimal is the most common multipurpose tree is a boon for the inhabitants of Garhwal Himalayan region. About 2/3rd of the cultivated area of Garhwal is rainfed and Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is the predominant food grain crop cultivated on the sloppy terraces in combination of G. optiva trees on terrace bunds. In Present study the productivity of wheat (Triticum aestivum) as intercrop in Grewia optiva based traditional agroforestry system along altitudinal gradient and aspect in mid hills of Garhwal Himalaya, India revels that G. optiva occupied average highest frequency (85%), stem density (145 trees/ha), TBC (7.68 m2/ha), IVI (86.51), tree height (7.38 m), Crown spread (5.34 m) in the elevation 1000-1500 m of Northern aspect (E1/N site). In the elevation 1000-1500 m, it was observed that there is a reduction in grain, straw and biological yield of wheat as 17.59%, 17.77% and 17.71% respectively on the southern aspect compared to northern aspect. Further elevation 1500-2000 m, the reduction in the average grain yield was recorded 37.31% under G. optiva based traditional agroforestry system in E2/S site. The phenophases of the wheat crop is sown in the month of December which emerges to crown root initiation (CRI) in January followed by tillering, milking, maturity and final harvest during May while G. optiva remain dormant from December to February, leafless in March and new flush of shoots in May. This reversal phenopases of two components are complimentary in tree crop interaction to enhance productivity.

Keywords:
Agroforestry Garhwal Himalayas Grewia optiva wheat yield

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