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Article

Computing Education Competence in Higher Education: Challenges for Teachers

1Centro de Tecnologías para la Academia, Universidad de La Sabana, Bogotá, Colombia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 406-412
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-9
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Cristina Hennig Manzuoli, Yasbley Segovia Cifuentes. Computing Education Competence in Higher Education: Challenges for Teachers. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):406-412. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-9.

Correspondence to: Cristina  Hennig Manzuoli, Centro de Tecnologías para la Academia, Universidad de La Sabana, Bogotá, Colombia. Email: cristinahm@unisabana.edu.co

Abstract

This paper presents positions and reflections about integrating Information and Communication Technologies (ICT’s) to teaching practice in higher education and teaching-learning digital environments. The main issues discussed deal with the education a teacher must receive in order to achieve an ICT pedagogical integration in virtual or non-virtual environments, andto designlearning activities that contribute to knowledge building and application for problem solving froma transdisciplinaryapproach.

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References

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Article

Changing the Image of Scientists among College Students in Israel

1Science education department, Hebrew university of Jerusalem

2Israel Education ministry instruction and curriculum design

3Achava Teacher College

4Educational Department Indiana University Bloomington


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 396-405
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-8
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Bar Varda, Pasit Koren, Edna Rubin, Anne Gail Buck. Changing the Image of Scientists among College Students in Israel. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):396-405. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-8.

Correspondence to: Bar  Varda, Science education department, Hebrew university of Jerusalem. Email: barvarda@zahav.net.il

Abstract

With this study, we sought to address some deficiencies in the image of scientists held by pre-service teachers in Israel. These include a few concerns for women scientists, as well as a lack of understanding about fieldwork and contemporary scientific equipment. The study was carried out with two groups of pre-service science students, mostly women. It was done through interference: following the web, meeting with experts and constructing leaning materials for pupils by the participants. Research was in the form of one strand research using qualitative methods. During the research, the image of women scientists changed considerably. Pre interference views were: there are no women scientists and physics and astrophysics are not for women. Women scientists were described as torn between family and work. In the post interference stage, a high appreciation for women scientists and their work in all domains was observed, woman scientist were portrayed as relaxed, taking part in team work, doing field work, and using specialized sophisticated equipment.

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References

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[[1]  Rubin, E., Bar, V. And Cohen, A. (2003). The images of Scientists and Science among Hebrew and Arabic speaking pre-service teachers in Israel. International Journal of Science Education, 25 (1), 35-48.
 
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[[5]  Buck G., Koren P., Yin X., Bar V 2011. Reframing Non-Science Majors’ Fundamental Understandings about Scientific Inquiry and Scientist, submitted for publications.
 
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[6]  Buck , G. Vicki L. Plano C. Diandra L. Yun L., Cerda-Lizarraga P. 2008, Examining the cognitive processes used by adolescent girls and women scientists in identifying science role models: A feminist approach. Science Education Volume 92, Issue 4, pages 688-707.
 
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Article

Case Studying Educational Research: A Way of Looking at Reality

1Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University of Oporto, Portugal, Rua Augusto Rosa, Portugal


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 391-395
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-7
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Maria de Nazaré Castro Trigo Coimbra, Alcina Manuela de Oliveira Martins. Case Studying Educational Research: A Way of Looking at Reality. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):391-395. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-7.

Correspondence to: Alcina Manuela de Oliveira Martins, Centre for Studies on Education and Training (CEEF/CeiEF), Lusófona University of Oporto, Portugal, Rua Augusto Rosa, Portugal. Email: amom@ulp.pt

Abstract

This study has investigated the use of case studies, applied by Master´s students in Educational Sciences. Given the increasing use of case study in educational research, key aspects of its construction were analysed, including literature review, methodological choices, data collection and analysis, the researcher´s positioning and the applicability of the results. The research was predominantly qualitative and category-based, having as sample 42 Master´s dissertations, including single and multiple case studies, from students attending a Portuguese university. The results show that mixed methodology, qualitative and quantitative, is predominant. However, not all students connect theory to their empirical study, nor do they look for the common and the particular. Even though students reveal awareness of the multidimensionality of social phenomena and the researcher´s role, only a minority adds alternative perspectives and control mechanisms, so as to safeguard methodological rigour. Often, it lacks the researcher’s reflexivity, usually implicated in the context research. In addition, the research report does not always present an appealing writing, capable of attracting the reader's attention and enabling forms of generalization, by approximation to similar contexts. Finally, the study shows Master´s students need more training, to strengthen their knowledge of methodological approaches. University courses, about empirical research in education, should prepare students to design and conduct their research project, in order to achieve a new way of looking at educational reality.

Keywords

Article

Exploring the Side Effects of Assessment in Secondary Schools and Its Impact on Students: Perspective from Bangladesh

1Education Specialist, Nari Maitree, Dhaka, Bangladesh

2Institute of Education and Research, Dhaka, Bangladesh


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 380-390
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Sumaiya Khanam Chowdhury, Shah Shamim Ahmed. Exploring the Side Effects of Assessment in Secondary Schools and Its Impact on Students: Perspective from Bangladesh. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):380-390. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-6.

Correspondence to: Sumaiya Khanam Chowdhury, Education Specialist, Nari Maitree, Dhaka, Bangladesh. Email: mim1288@gmail.com

Abstract

The main objective of the study was to explore the side effects of assessment in secondary schools and its impact on students. The study was descriptive in nature and the researcher used a qualitative approach to collect and analyze data. The researcher selected three schools, as a sample of the study, by Stratified Sampling method based on their last two years board result. She also selected fifteen students of secondary schools conveniently from the sample schools. For collecting relevant evidence and data from respondents, the researcher used tools like classroom observation, in-depth interview and focus group discussion. From the study it was found that, some noticeable side effects of assessment are suffering from Self-inferiority complex, losing self- confidence, disregard for school and teachers, attempt of hurting them, selecting wrong path, increase of competitive behavior etc. Based on the findings of the study the researcher recommended allowing students’ participation while developing assessment tool for them.

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References

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[[1]  Ahsan, S. (2007). Classroom Assessment in Secondary Education: Facilitator or Barrierto Learning? Unpublished masters’ thesis, Institute of Education and Research, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
 
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[[3]  Tarana, K. N. (2011). Exploring the Perception of Assessment: What Assessment Means to Teachers’ and Students’ in secondary School. Unpublished masters’ thesis, Institute of Education and Research, University of Dhaka, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
 
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Article

Fairclough’s Concepts of Language Policy and Language Planning: A Comparative Study between Malaysia and Cambodia

1Sultan Zainal Abidin University, Malaysia


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 375-379
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Mohd Nazri Latiff Azmi, Nurul Wahida Samsuddin, Mairas Abd Rahman. Fairclough’s Concepts of Language Policy and Language Planning: A Comparative Study between Malaysia and Cambodia. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):375-379. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-5.

Correspondence to: Mohd Nazri Latiff Azmi, Sultan Zainal Abidin University, Malaysia. Email: mohdnazri@unisza.edu.my

Abstract

This paper is a comparative study of two important journals which reflect the challenges faced by two developing countries: Malaysia and Cambodia. The objectives of this study are to investigate the problems, planning and challenges faced by both countries and also to justify the language policy and planning of both countries using Fairclough’s concepts in Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). The findings show that language policy and language planning in Malaysia and Cambodia are majorly influenced by the political development at both of the countries themselves. Obviously, the national language of Bahasa Malaysia and Khmer has experienced development and standardization surrounded with the influence of second language, that is English.

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References

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[[1]  Thong, T. (n.d.). Language Planning and Language Policy of Cambodia. Retrieved April 05, 2013, from http://sealang.net/sala/archives/pdf8/thel1985language.pdf.
 
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[[4]  Bourdieu, P. (2003). Language and symbolic power. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
 
[[5]  Cameron, D. (2005). Working with spoken discourse. London: Sage Publications.
 
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Article

Relations of Gender, Body and Sexuality: Students’ Conceptions on Self-care Related to Teaching Sexually Transmitted Diseases

1Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, PGEBS – RJ, Brasil

2Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, LEAS – RJ, Brasil


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 366-374
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Roberta Ribeiro De Cicco, Eliane Portes Vargas. Relations of Gender, Body and Sexuality: Students’ Conceptions on Self-care Related to Teaching Sexually Transmitted Diseases. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):366-374. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-4.

Correspondence to: Roberta  Ribeiro De Cicco, Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, PGEBS – RJ, Brasil. Email: robertarcicco@gmail.com

Abstract

Adolescence, a fundamental stage of youth development experienced by all young students, is marked by a moment of transition, when several changes take place, from attitudes, questioning and opinions to the passage towards sexuality, with a partner. During this stage, the body becomes loaded with connotations in relation to self representation and care, being interpreted in very specific ways by different societies and social groups. The study aims to present reflections on differences related to gender and body care found in the conception of young students between ages 17 to 20 from a class of secondary school in a State School located in the metropolitan region of Rio de Janeiro – Brazil encompassing sexuality. The results indicate distinct conceptions of gender related to decision making linked to sexual initiation, as well as body care in connection with the acknowledging of body signals and attitudes for STD prevention.

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References

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Article

Effectiveness of Task-Based Instructional Materials in Developing Writing Skills of BS Fisheries Freshmen

1Languages Department, College of Arts and Sciences, Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University, South La Union Campus, Agoo, La Union, Philippines Zip Code

2Graduate School, Saint Louis University, Baguio City, Zip Code


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 359-365
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Loreto B. Waguey, Esther R. Hufana. Effectiveness of Task-Based Instructional Materials in Developing Writing Skills of BS Fisheries Freshmen. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):359-365. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-3.

Correspondence to: Loreto  B. Waguey, Languages Department, College of Arts and Sciences, Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University, South La Union Campus, Agoo, La Union, Philippines Zip Code. Email: loriewaguey@yahoo.com

Abstract

The study generally aimed to enhance the writing skills of the Bachelor of Science in Fisheries freshman students enrolled in English 102 (Writing in the Discipline) at Don Mariano Marcos Memorial State University (DMMMSU)-Institute of Fisheries (IF). Specifically, it aimed to: 1) determine the writing competency level of the students; 2) identify the learning strategies frequently used by the students; 3) develop task-based instructional materials based on the writing competency level of the students and their frequency of use of learning strategies; 4) determine the effectiveness of the task-based instructional materials in enhancing the writing performance of the students; and 5) determine the relationship between the effectiveness of the task-based instructional materials and the frequency of use of learning strategies. The first year BSF students had low level of competence in writing four types of texts (explanation of a process, recount, essay and paraphrase) and in nine writing skill areas (sentence unity, ability to carry out the task with minimal support, sentence emphasis, paragraph coherence, paragraph unity, paragraph emphasis, accuracy, sentence structure, and language features). The students’ frequency of use of learning strategies was “Medium” or “Sometimes Used” for both direct and indirect strategies. The use of the task-based instructional materials significantly increased the posttest scores of the students in paragraph unity, paragraph coherence, paragraph emphasis, methods of beginning and ending compositions and mechanics. Frequency of use of learning strategies is significantly and positively related with the pretest and posttest scores of the students. Based on the findings, the task-based instructional materials are recommended for use in order to improve students’ writing skills particularly to students who frequently use their learning strategies. Likewise, the development of task-based instructional materials is encouraged in other subjects or disciplines.

Keywords

References

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Article

Students’ Proficiency in English Language Relationship with Academic Performance in Science and Technical Education

1Physics Department College of Education (T) Lafiagi, Kwara State, Nigeria

2Metal Work Department College of Education (T) Lafiagi, Kwara State, Nigeria

3General Studies Department College of Education (T) Lafiagi, Kwara State, Nigeria


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 355-358
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Jacob Kola Aina, Alexander Gbenga Ogundele, Shola Sunday Olanipekun. Students’ Proficiency in English Language Relationship with Academic Performance in Science and Technical Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):355-358. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-2.

Correspondence to: Jacob  Kola Aina, Physics Department College of Education (T) Lafiagi, Kwara State, Nigeria. Email: akoja64@hotmail.com

Abstract

This is a descriptive research of a correlation type where 120 students were sampled from a college of education to find out the relationship between proficiency in English language and academic performance among students of science and technical education. Findings revealed that there is correlation between proficiency in English language and academic performance of students in science and technical education; students in technical education performed better than their counterpart in science education; students who passed English language performed better than those who failed both in science and technical education. Some recommendations were suggested at the end of the study.

Keywords

References

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Article

Types and Causes of Students’ Disruptive Behavior in Classroom at Secondary Level in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan

1Institute of Education and Research, University of Science and Technology, Bannu, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan


American Journal of Educational Research. 2013, 1(9), 350-354
DOI: 10.12691/education-1-9-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Safdar Rehman Ghazi, Gulap Shahzada, Muhammad Tariq, Abdul Qayum Khan. Types and Causes of Students’ Disruptive Behavior in Classroom at Secondary Level in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. American Journal of Educational Research. 2013; 1(9):350-354. doi: 10.12691/education-1-9-1.

Correspondence to: Safdar Rehman Ghazi, Institute of Education and Research, University of Science and Technology, Bannu, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan. Email: drsrghazi@yahoo.com

Abstract

Secondary school teachers have repeatedly ranked disruptive behaviour as one of the most serious hurdle in effective teaching learning process in the classroom. It has also been reported that the students in public schools feel insecure due to lack of effective disciplinary measures and probable for aggression and unpleasant situation. Teachers are often not well prepared to manage classrooms’ discipline. The present study aimed to investigate the types and causes of disruptive behaviour in classroom at secondary level. Teachers who were teaching in the secondary schools of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa constituted the population of the study. Five hundred (500) teachers were taken as sample, using multi-stage random sampling method. A questionnaire was developed on five point Likert Scale and was distributed among the sampled teachers and collected their responses regarding the types and causes of students’ disruptive behaviour in classroom. Some of the types of disruptive behaviour were reported unanimously reported by most of the teacher however a significant deviation has been reported. It is recommended that the disruptive behaviour of students of secondary schools in Pakistan needs an extensive attention of educators, policy makers and the government to address this area for quality education in the country. For this purpose proper trainings may be arranged for administrators and teachers to equip them regarding disruptive behavior and classroom management.

Keywords

References

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