American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, 6(8), 1194-1197
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-8-19
Open AccessArticle

The Inclusion of Thinking Skills: A Panacea for Improving Instructional Practices in Nigerian Secondary School Education

Nwosu Jonathan Chinaka1, John Henry Chukwudi2, , Izang Aaron Afan3 and Adejokun Adebusola4

1Department of Educational Foundations, Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo Ogun State, Nigeria

2School Librarian, Greensprings School, Anthony Campus Lagos State, Nigeria

3Department of Computer and Information Technology, Babcock University, Ilishan-Remo Ogun State, Nigeria

4Biology/Thinking Skills Teacher, Greensprings School, Anthony Campus Lagos State, Nigeria

Pub. Date: August 21, 2018

Cite this paper:
Nwosu Jonathan Chinaka, John Henry Chukwudi, Izang Aaron Afan and Adejokun Adebusola. The Inclusion of Thinking Skills: A Panacea for Improving Instructional Practices in Nigerian Secondary School Education. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(8):1194-1197. doi: 10.12691/education-6-8-19

Abstract

Having critically studied the current New Secondary School Curriculum (NSSC), it is glaring that there was neither the inclusion nor any consideration given to Thinking Skills. Rather, much emphasis was made on IT and Entrepreneurial skills. Thus, the question is: how can we teach these subjects without emphasising thinking skills, and teaching students to be great critical thinkers using thinking skills?” It is on this ground that this paper is conceptualised to call for a review of the NSSC to include Thinking Skills, so as to create an equilibrium in the teaching and learning process. This will make the students problem solvers and it will reposition them to be invaluable assets to the Nigerian society and beyond. This paper examines such issues as the thinking skills initiative, adoption of thinking points and maps in the classroom, a theoretical review of teaching thinking skills in schools, inclusion of thinking skills in the UK and the new secondary school curriculum in Nigeria. Lastly, recommendations are made on the benefits of thinking skills inclusion in the teaching curriculum.

Keywords:
thinking skills New Secondary School Curriculum (NSSC) instructional practices secondary school

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