American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, 6(8), 1172-1181
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-8-16
Open AccessArticle

Combining Inquiry-Based Hands-On and Simulation Methods with Cooperative Learning on Students’ Learning Outcomes in Electric Circuits

Godwin Kwame Aboagye1, , Theophilus Aquinas Ossei-Anto1 and Joseph Ghartey Ampiah1

1Department of Science Education, University of Cape Coast, Ghana

Pub. Date: August 17, 2018

Cite this paper:
Godwin Kwame Aboagye, Theophilus Aquinas Ossei-Anto and Joseph Ghartey Ampiah. Combining Inquiry-Based Hands-On and Simulation Methods with Cooperative Learning on Students’ Learning Outcomes in Electric Circuits. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(8):1172-1181. doi: 10.12691/education-6-8-16

Abstract

Concepts in electric circuits are reported in literature as being problematic for students at all levels of pre-tertiary education [1] and the situation in Ghana is not different [2]. Hence, innovative ways of teaching are being explored by researchers to remediate the problem. This study, therefore, was premised on the fact that combining inquiry-based real hands-on and computer simulation methods with cooperative learning has the potential of improving students’ learning outcomes. In all, 110 senior high school Form 2 students from two schools who participated were put into heterogeneous-ability and friendship cooperative learning groupings. Each group was taught electric circuits with the combination of inquiry-based real hands-on and computer simulation method. The aim was to compare the two groups in terms of their scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. Within each group, the hypothetical-deductive and empirical-inductive students were also compared along the two learning outcomes. The results showed among others that the heterogeneous-ability group outperformed their counterparts in conceptual understanding of electric circuits but not scientific reasoning. Hypothetical-deductive and empirical-inductive students in the heterogeneous-ability group outperformed their counterparts in scientific reasoning and conceptual understanding. Implications of the findings for teaching and learning are discussed.

Keywords:
learning outcome scientific reasoning hypothetical-deductive reasoning empirical-inductive reasoning conceptual understanding

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