American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, 6(8), 1153-1163
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-8-14
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Evaluating the Impact of Teaching and Learning of Mathematics and Science using Local Language (Language of Play) in Primary Schools in Muchinga Province, Zambia, a Case of Chinsali District

Edward Nkonde1, , Nimrod Siluyele1, Malawo Mweemba1, Leonard Nkhata2, Goodhope Kaluba1 and Cleopas Zulu1

1Department of Information Communication Technology, Kapasa Makasa University, Chinsali, Zambia

2Department of Mathematics and Science Education, The Copperbelt University, Kitwe, Zambia

Pub. Date: August 15, 2018

Cite this paper:
Edward Nkonde, Nimrod Siluyele, Malawo Mweemba, Leonard Nkhata, Goodhope Kaluba and Cleopas Zulu. Evaluating the Impact of Teaching and Learning of Mathematics and Science using Local Language (Language of Play) in Primary Schools in Muchinga Province, Zambia, a Case of Chinsali District. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(8):1153-1163. doi: 10.12691/education-6-8-14

Abstract

One of the factors blamed for poor academic performance in the Zambian primary Schools has been the use of English in place of mother tongue as a medium of instruction. In 2013, the government replaced English with a familiar local language in teaching grade one to four. The aim of this paper was to make a preliminary evaluation of the impact of using a local or familiar language as a medium of instruction for teaching and learning mathematics and science in Muchinga province of Zambia. Taking Chinsali district of Muchinga province as a case study, the research sampled 4(30%) of the 13 zones in the district. Schools within the sampled zones were randomly picked and questionnaires were administered to lower primary school teachers. The research findings show that, firstly, while teachers supported and appreciated the efficacy of the pedagogy, they also faced challenges in using it to teach mathematics and science. Secondly, teachers reported that using a local language as a medium of instruction freed pupils from timidity. There was tremendous class participation during lessons. Thirdly, the pedagogy reduced rote learning and increased concept assimilation of mathematics and science concepts. The major recommendations are that the ministry in charge of education should embark on many longitudinal studies in the province to see how the policy is working. A look at countries where using mother tongue to teach mathematics and science has succeeded, shows that it has gone through many years of evaluations. It is these several years of monitoring that lead to its success.

Keywords:
mother tongue language of play medium of instruction pedagogy and zones

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