American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2018, 6(5), 424-430
DOI: 10.12691/education-6-5-9
Open AccessResearch Article

Measures to Develop Vocabulary for Children 3-4 Years Old with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Inclusive Kindergarten School

Do Thi Thao1, and Bui Thi Lam1

1Faculty of Special Education, Hanoi National University of Education, Hanoi, Vietnam

Pub. Date: April 19, 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Educational Research in Vietnam: From Fundamentals to Application)

Cite this paper:
Do Thi Thao and Bui Thi Lam. Measures to Develop Vocabulary for Children 3-4 Years Old with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Inclusive Kindergarten School. American Journal of Educational Research. 2018; 6(5):424-430. doi: 10.12691/education-6-5-9

Abstract

The research was accomplished with 40 teachers, who are teaching in inclusive kindergarten school in Hanoi in order to evaluate the reality of the degree of utilization and the effectiveness of vocabulary development of children 3 – 4 years old with autism spectrum disorders, which was conducted by teachers then propose some possible measures based on that. The result indicates that the teachers lack of flexibility in the use of the measures, particularly the coordination of measures; the measures have not focused on the vocabulary development but more about perception. From the reality, the research proposes seven measures of vocabulary development of children 3 – 4 years old with autism spectrum disorders focusing on games, providing meaningful situations, enhancing communication through the pictures, encouraging the interaction of children with their friends… Experimental result has shown that children make progress of vocabulary development in all the aspects (1) the ability to understand the meaning of words (2) the ability to apply the correct words into situations (3) the number of words which children can understand and speak. This demonstrates that the proposed measures have had a positive impact on the children.

Keywords:
children measures inclusive kindergarten school vocabulary autism spectrum disorder

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