American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(11), 1172-1176
DOI: 10.12691/education-5-11-10
Open AccessArticle

Continuing Professional Development Program as Evidenced by the Lenses of QSU Licensed Professional Teachers

Romiro G. Bautista1, , Violeta G. Benigno1, Jamina G. Camayang1, Jordan C. Ursua Jr.1, Cynthia G. Agaloos1, Fluther N.G. Ligado2 and Kris N. Buminaang2

1Faculty Researchers, College of Teacher Education, Quirino State University-Main Campus

2Student Researchers, College of Teacher Education, Quirino State University-Main Campus

Pub. Date: December 06, 2017

Cite this paper:
Romiro G. Bautista, Violeta G. Benigno, Jamina G. Camayang, Jordan C. Ursua Jr., Cynthia G. Agaloos, Fluther N.G. Ligado and Kris N. Buminaang. Continuing Professional Development Program as Evidenced by the Lenses of QSU Licensed Professional Teachers. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(11):1172-1176. doi: 10.12691/education-5-11-10

Abstract

Continuing Professional Development (CPD) program as applied in the teaching profession puts every Licensed Professional Teacher (LPT) at the center of leveraging the conditions and quality of teaching and learning in the Philippines. This study puts forward the idea that LPTs are self-directed and autonomous and lifelong learner-professionals driven by their internal motivation to be armed with the current knowledge in the educational topography. Employing the Explicative-Reductive Research design of Descriptive Research, it was found out that the LPT-respondents had a good to very good state of awareness on the impact of undergoing CPD program to their profession which manifests that they are self-directed, internally motivated, and autonomous and lifelong learner-professionals. Singles were found to be more cognizant on the impact of undergoing CPD than their married counterparts although both were much aware of its educational significance. Moreover, majority of the respondents were not in-favor of the CPD implementation in the country. It was concluded that LPTs are self-directed and autonomous and lifelong learner-professionals driven by their internal motivation to undergo professional development activities in arming themselves with the current knowledge to meet the needs of the times.

Keywords:
autonomous learners continuing professional development program life-long learners licensed professional teachers professionalism

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