American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2017, 5(11), 1158-1161
DOI: 10.12691/education-5-11-7
Open AccessCase Study

The Effects of Scientific Inquiry Simulations on Students’ Higher Order Thinking Skills of Chemical Reaction and Attitude towards Chemistry

Bilal Khaleel Younis1,

1Technology Education Department, Palestine Technical University Khadoorie- Arroub branch, Hebron, Palestine

Pub. Date: December 02, 2017

Cite this paper:
Bilal Khaleel Younis. The Effects of Scientific Inquiry Simulations on Students’ Higher Order Thinking Skills of Chemical Reaction and Attitude towards Chemistry. American Journal of Educational Research. 2017; 5(11):1158-1161. doi: 10.12691/education-5-11-7

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of scientific inquiry simulations on higher order thinking skills and attitudes of chemical reaction. A mixed method approach was implemented; an experimental pre-test post-test and a focus group were conducted to collect data. Seventy-six students from 9th grade were randomly assigned to the experimental and control group. Thirty-eight students participated in each group. A Higher Order Thinking Skills Exam, a Chemistry Attitude Scale and a Scientific Inquiry Worksheet were used for data collection. A focus group was also conducted with ten students from each group to shed more light on the findings. The results showed that the post-test scores and attitudes of students who were taught with scientific inquiry simulations were found to be higher than those in the control group who were taught with scientific inquiry activities. The findings support the notion that chemistry teachers should be supported to use scientific inquiry simulations for teaching chemistry.

Keywords:
scientific inquiry simulations higher order thinking skills chemical reaction

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