American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2016, 4(13), 954-960
DOI: 10.12691/education-4-13-7
Open AccessArticle

An Evaluation of School Health Promoting Programmes and the Implementation of Child Friendly Schools Initiative in Primary Schools in Kenya

Limo Alice1, , Jelimo Joan1 and Kipkoech Lydia Cheruto1

1Department of Educational Management, University of Eldoret, Eldoret, Kenya

Pub. Date: August 17, 2016

Cite this paper:
Limo Alice, Jelimo Joan and Kipkoech Lydia Cheruto. An Evaluation of School Health Promoting Programmes and the Implementation of Child Friendly Schools Initiative in Primary Schools in Kenya. American Journal of Educational Research. 2016; 4(13):954-960. doi: 10.12691/education-4-13-7

Abstract

This paper discusses the efforts related to school health that have been put in place in primary schools to promote learner friendly environments based on a study that was done in Uasin Gishu county, Kenya. The study was guided by the following objective: to assess the health promoting programmes that have been put in place and their effect on implementation of child friendly schools initiative. This study was anchored on resiliency theory as proposed by Krovetz (1998). Resiliency theory defines the protective factors in families, schools, and communities that exist in the lives of successful children and youth and compares these protective factors with what is missing from the lives of children and youth who are troubled. This study adopted a pragmatic approach to research and a mixed methods research design. From the 338 public primary schools in the county, a total of 103 schools were sampled to participate in the study which constituted 30% of the target population. A total of 103 headteachers and 103 class seven class teachers and 2,259 class seven pupils, who were grouped into 202 focus group discussions, participated in the study. Data was collected using questionnaires, interviews and focus group discussions. Data was analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics as well as qualitative techniques. It was established that there is a significant positive relationship between school health promoting programmes and implementation of child friendly schools initiative. It was also noted that schools still experienced challenges in relation to provision of adequate nutrition, clean and safe drinking water as well as access to proper healthcare within the reach of children and communities. The study is significant to headteachers, parents, communities and the ministry of education in an effort to promote learner friendly schools.

Keywords:
health promoting school nutrition child friendly schools school programme initiative

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