American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
Open Access
Journal Browser
Go
American Journal of Educational Research. 2015, 3(2), 197-207
DOI: 10.12691/education-3-2-13
Open AccessArticle

Video Analysis and Modeling Performance Task to Promote Becoming Like Scientists in Classrooms

Loo Kang Wee1, and Tze Kwang Leong2

1Ministry of Education, Educational Technology Division, Singapore

2Ministry of Education, Raffles Girl's School, Singapore

Pub. Date: February 10, 2015

Cite this paper:
Loo Kang Wee and Tze Kwang Leong. Video Analysis and Modeling Performance Task to Promote Becoming Like Scientists in Classrooms. American Journal of Educational Research. 2015; 3(2):197-207. doi: 10.12691/education-3-2-13

Abstract

This paper aims to share the use of Tracker—a free open source video analysis and modeling tool—that is increasingly used as a pedagogical tool for the effective learning and teaching of Physics for Grade 9 (Secondary 3) students in Singapore schools to make physics relevant to the real world. We discuss the pedagogical use of Tracker, guided by the Framework for K-12 Science Education by National Research Council, USA to help students to be more like scientists. For a period of 6 to 10 weeks, students use a video analysis coupled with the 8 practices of sciences such as 1. Ask question, 2. Use models, 3. Plan and carry out investigation, 4. Analyse and interpret data, 5. Use mathematical and computational thinking, 6. Construct explanations, 7. Argue from evidence and 8. Communicate information. This paper’s focus in on discussing some of the performance task design ideas such as 3.1 flip video, 3.2 starting with simple classroom activities, 3.3 primer science activity, 3.4 integrative dynamics and kinematics lesson flow using Tracker progressing from video analysis to video modeling, 3.5 motivating performance task, 3.6 assessment rubrics and lastly 3.7 close mentorship. Initial research findings using pre- and post- perception survey, triangulated with student interviews suggest an increased level of students’ enjoyment such as “I look forward to physics lessons”, “I really enjoy physics lessons” and “Physics is one of the most interesting school subjects” etc for the more mathematically inclined students. Most importantly, the artefacts of the students’ performance task in terms of the research report and Tracker *.TRZ files, further suggest that the use of the Tracker for performance tasks, guided by the Framework for K-12 Science Education by National Research Council, USA, can be an innovative way to mentor authentic and meaningful learning that empowers students to be more like scientists.

Keywords:
tracker video analysis video modeling 8 practices of science ICT and multi-media in physics education pedagogical methods and strategies physics curriculum and content organization physics teaching and learning at elementary secondary and university levels

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Figures

Figure of 14

References:

[1]  Q. Helen, S. Heidi, and K. Thomas, A Framework for K-12 Science Education: Practices, Crosscutting Concepts, and Core Ideas. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press, 2012.
 
[2]  D. Brown. (2012). Tracker Free Video Analysis and Modeling Tool for Physics Education. Available: http://www.cabrillo.edu/~dbrown/tracker/.
 
[3]  L. K. Wee, “Tracker Video Analysis: Bouncing Ball,” ed, 2012.
 
[4]  L. K. Wee, C. Chew, G. H. Goh, S. Tan, and T. L. Lee, “Using Tracker as a pedagogical tool for understanding projectile motion,” Physics Education, vol. 47, p. 448, 2012.
 
[5]  W. Christian and F. Esquembre, “Computational Modeling with Open Source Physics and Easy Java Simulations,” presented at the South African National Institute for Theoretical Physics Event, University of Pretoria, South Africa, 2012.
 
[6]  L. K. Wee, “One-dimensional collision carts computer model and its design ideas for productive experiential learning,” Physics Education, vol. 47, p. 301, 2012.
 
[7]  D. Brown, “Combining computational physics with video analysis in Tracker,” presented at the American Association of Physics Teachers AAPT Summer Meeting, Greensboro 2007.
 
[8]  D. Brown, “Video Modeling: Combining Dynamic Model Simulations with Traditional Video Analysis,” presented at the American Association of Physics Teachers AAPT Summer Meeting, Edmonton, 2008.
 
[9]  D. Brown, “Video Modeling with Tracker,” presented at the American Association of Physics Teachers AAPT Summer Meeting, Ann Arbor, 2009.
 
[10]  D. Brown. (2010). Tracker Introduction to Video Modeling (AAPT 2010). Available: http://www.compadre.org/Repository/document/ServeFile.cfm?ID=10188&DocID=1749.
 
[11]  D. Brown and W. Christian, “Simulating What You See,” in MPTL 16 and HSCI 2011, Ljubljana, Slovenia, 2011.
 
[12]  D. Brown and A. J. Cox, “Innovative Uses of Video Analysis,” The Physics Teacher, vol. 47, pp. 145-150, 2009.
 
[13]  L. K. Wee, “Open Educational Resources from Performance Task using Video Analysis and Modeling-Tracker and K12 science education framework,” presented at the 8th Joint Meeting of Chinese Physicists Worldwide (OCPA8) Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, 2014.
 
[14]  D. R. Garrison, “Self-directed learning: Toward a comprehensive model,” Adult Education Quarterly, vol. 48, p. 18, Fall97 1997.
 
[15]  B. Barron and L. Darling-Hammond. (2008). Teaching for meaningful learning. Available: http://www.edutopia.org/pdfs/edutopia-teaching-for-meaningful-learning.pdf.
 
[16]  ISKME. (2008, 02 June). Open Educational Resources. Available: http://www.oercommons.org/.