American Journal of Educational Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-6126 ISSN (Online): 2327-6150 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/education Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Educational Research. 2021, 9(3), 142-145
DOI: 10.12691/education-9-3-8
Open AccessArticle

There’s Aha! in Haha: Unraveling the Serious Side of Humor in the Classroom

Arben Gibson G. Camayang1, Jocelyn D. Natividad2, Jamina G. Camayang1 and Romiro G. Bautista1,

1College of Teacher Education, Quirino State University-Main Campus, Philippines

2Cabarroguis National School of Arts and Trades, Department of Education-Quirino, Philippines

Pub. Date: March 28, 2021

Cite this paper:
Arben Gibson G. Camayang, Jocelyn D. Natividad, Jamina G. Camayang and Romiro G. Bautista. There’s Aha! in Haha: Unraveling the Serious Side of Humor in the Classroom. American Journal of Educational Research. 2021; 9(3):142-145. doi: 10.12691/education-9-3-8

Abstract

In a fast-changing classroom setting, one must consider the importance of knowing the qualities of who occupy the four corners of the classroom - the 21st century learners who have distinct personalities specifically in a dynamic learning environment. This study is designed to explore the experiences of three high school students from Cabarroguis National School of Arts and Trades who experienced humor as a strategic tool in teaching. Qualitative data were gathered from the informants’ interview. Data were processed through document trail among the informants to confirm the veracity of their claims based on the transcriptions. Thematic analysis unraveled four themes on the experiences of the informants: (1) Distinguishing the Ideals, (2) Strict and Serious: A No-No for the Young Learners, (3) To Laugh is to Remember: Humor Aids Recall, and (4) To Laugh is to Connect: Humor Magnets Attention. It is concluded that 21st century learners are idealistic learners who easily get bored with strict and serious classroom atmosphere but aroused with instructional humor which attracts their attention, maintains their discipline, and improves their performances.

Keywords:
instructional humor 21st Century Learners action research CNSAT-Quirino philippines

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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