American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine
ISSN (Print): 2333-4592 ISSN (Online): 2333-4606 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajssm Editor-in-chief: Ratko Pavlović
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American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2015, 3(5), 85-89
DOI: 10.12691/ajssm-3-5-1
Open AccessArticle

The Effect of Swimming Exercise on Motor Development Level in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

Elif Top1,

1Faculty of Sport Sciences, Usak University, Turkey

Pub. Date: November 21, 2015

Cite this paper:
Elif Top. The Effect of Swimming Exercise on Motor Development Level in Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities. American Journal of Sports Science and Medicine. 2015; 3(5):85-89. doi: 10.12691/ajssm-3-5-1

Abstract

Objectives: In this study, it was aimed to analyze the effect of swimming exercise on motor development level in adolescents with intellectual disabilities. Methods: A total of 30 mild intellectual disability (MID) individuals between 15-18 age groups participated the study. Bruininks–Oseretsky Test of Motor Proficiency-Second Edition (BOT-2)- Short Form were performed to determine basic motor characteristics of children. BOT-2-Short Form was applied to the participants before and after the ten-month swimming exercise program (60 dk/ 3 days /10 week). Results: According to research findings, in terms of body weight, manual dexterity, speed and agility, upper limb coordination, and BOT-2 total point parameters, there was no statistically significant difference found between groups, measurements (pre-test and post-test), groups and their measurements (p>0.05). In terms of fine motor precision, and fine motor integration parameters, while there was no statistically significant difference found between groups (p>0.05); a significant statistical difference was found between measurements (pre-test and post-test), groups and their measurements (p<0.05). In terms of bilateral coordination parameter, while there was no statistically significant difference found between measurements (pre-test and post-test), groups and their measurements (p>0.05); a significant statistical difference was found between groups (p<0.05). In terms of balance parameter and strength, while there was no statistically significant difference found between groups, groups and measurements (p>0.05); statistically significant difference was found between measurements (pre-test and post-test) (p<0.05). Conclusion: Consequently, regularly applied exercise programmes improve life quality level of individuals with MID by contributing to their motor development level.

Keywords:
motor development intellectual disabilities exercise

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