American Journal of Rural Development
ISSN (Print): 2333-4762 ISSN (Online): 2333-4770 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajrd Editor-in-chief: Chi-Ming Lai
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American Journal of Rural Development. 2017, 5(3), 65-72
DOI: 10.12691/ajrd-5-3-2
Open AccessArticle

Social Capital and Agricultural Technology Adoption among Ethiopian Farmers

Nizam A. Husen1, , Tim K. Loos2 and Khalid H.A. Siddig1, 2

1International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Addis Ababa Ethiopia, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart, Germany

2Humboldt University of Berlin, Germany and Khartoum University, the Sudan

Pub. Date: April 25, 2017

Cite this paper:
Nizam A. Husen, Tim K. Loos and Khalid H.A. Siddig. Social Capital and Agricultural Technology Adoption among Ethiopian Farmers. American Journal of Rural Development. 2017; 5(3):65-72. doi: 10.12691/ajrd-5-3-2

Abstract

Despite the recent efforts to increase agricultural productivity in Ethiopia, food insecurity remains a major challenge in the country. Improving smallholders´ productivity requires the adoption of suitable agricultural technologies and practices. Previous researches highlighted the importance of socio-economic factors; but widely overlooked the role of social capital in technology adoption and its potential to create collective actions, reduce transaction costs, relax supply side constraints, and disseminate information. Using socio-economic data of 398 farming households, the study assessed social capital as a determinant for soil and water conservation practices (SWC) such as terraces, bunds and agro-forestry as well as adopting productivity enhancing technologies (PET) such as fertilizers and improved high yielding seed varieties applying a probit model. The result showed that members of Iddir (informal funeral group) were more likely to adopt SWC (18.2%). For the case of PET, Iddir members were 12.8% less likely to adopt. Being members of Jarsumma (informal conflict resolution) increased the likelihood of SWC and PET adoption by 12.87% and 17.8%, respectively. Therefore, technology transfer should consider different types of social capital as an alternative policy option to the prevailing top down approaches in order to improve smallholder livelihoods.

Keywords:
social capital technology adoption Ethiopia

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