American Journal of Pharmacological Sciences
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American Journal of Pharmacological Sciences. 2017, 5(1), 1-7
DOI: 10.12691/ajps-5-1-1
Open AccessArticle

Review of Evolving Trends in Clinical Pharmacy Curriculum around the Globe

Azhar Hussain1, Madeeha Malik1 and Saad Abdullah1,

1Hamdard Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hamdard University Islamabad Campus, Pakistan

Pub. Date: February 06, 2017

Cite this paper:
Azhar Hussain, Madeeha Malik and Saad Abdullah. Review of Evolving Trends in Clinical Pharmacy Curriculum around the Globe. American Journal of Pharmacological Sciences. 2017; 5(1):1-7. doi: 10.12691/ajps-5-1-1

Abstract

Pharmacy education in developing countries in the past, have mainly focused on industrial and product development roles of pharmacist. But these, major changes have been seen in pharmacy practice and other practice fields for pharmacists. The introduction of clinical pharmacy as a major discipline has necessitated a change in the current curriculum of pharmacy education in developing countries. The aim of this literature review is to summarize the research findings related to different clinical pharmacy curriculum being followed for training students in patient care areas among developed and developing countries including Pakistan. A total of 50 published articles were reviewed regarding current clinical pharmacy curriculum and clinical clerkship models which are followed worldwide. This review concluded that there is a need to upgrade the clinical pharmacy curriculum in the country so the pharmacist can be involved effectively in provision of direct patient care. The stakeholders should take strict actions to design an integrated clinical pharmacy model to be implemented in clinical clerkship for students. Therefore policy makers should accelerate legislative and regulatory changes to expand scope of clinical pharmacy practice in Pakistan.

Keywords:
clinical pharmacy curriculum developing countries developed countries Pakistan

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