American Journal of Public Health Research
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American Journal of Public Health Research. 2018, 6(5), 222-226
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-6-5-3
Open AccessArticle

A Multinomial Logistic Regression Examination of TV Time and Two Different Measures of Obesity in U.S. Adults

Peter D. Hart1, 2,

1Health Promotion Program, Montana State University - Northern, Havre, MT 59501

2Kinesmetrics Lab, Montana State University - Northern, Havre, MT 59501

Pub. Date: September 18, 2018

Cite this paper:
Peter D. Hart. A Multinomial Logistic Regression Examination of TV Time and Two Different Measures of Obesity in U.S. Adults. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2018; 6(5):222-226. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-6-5-3

Abstract

Background: Physical inactivity and sedentary behavior are known factors related to the growing obesity rates in US adults. However, most population-based physical activity research primarily use a single measure of obesity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between television (TV) time and two different measures of obesity in US adults. Methods: This study used data from adults 20+ years of age participating in the 2015-2016 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Using body mass index (BMI), participants were categorized as obese if their values were 30 kg/m2 or greater. Using waist circumference (WC), participants were categorized as obese if their values were greater than 88 (females) or 102 cm (males). TV time was assessed from a survey question and adults were categorized into one of four different groups. Multinomial logistic regression was used to model the relationship between TV time and three different obese status categories. Results: In fully adjusted models, odds of being BMI obese (OR=1.98; 95% CI: 1.32-2.98) and WC obese (OR=2.76; 95% CI: 1.88-4.05) were significantly greater in adults with 5+ hours of TV time as compared to those with < 1 hour. In fully adjusted multinomial models, odds of being BMI or WC obese (OR=2.18; 95% CI: 1.43-3.34) and BMI and WC obese (OR=2.80; 95% CI: 1.68-4.65) were significantly greater in adults with 5+ hours of TV time as compared to those with < 1 hour. Conclusion: Results from this study indicate that TV time is clearly related to both overall and abdominal obesity in US adults. Furthermore, this relationship remains in light of MVPA and appears stronger for adults with both types of obesity.

Keywords:
physical inactivity obesity sedentary behavior epidemiology

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