American Journal of Public Health Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-669X ISSN (Online): 2327-6703 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajphr Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
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American Journal of Public Health Research. 2016, 4(5), 188-190
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-4-5-5
Open AccessArticle

Attaining a 64% Reduction in Fall-Caused Hospitalizations among Community Resident Elders: Two Multifactorial Studies

David C. Schwartz1, 2 and Patrick C. Hardigan3,

1Public Health, State University of New Jersey

2Medicine, University of Miami

3Statistical Consulting Center, Nova Southeastern University

Pub. Date: September 14, 2016

Cite this paper:
David C. Schwartz and Patrick C. Hardigan. Attaining a 64% Reduction in Fall-Caused Hospitalizations among Community Resident Elders: Two Multifactorial Studies. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2016; 4(5):188-190. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-4-5-5

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the studies reported here is: 1.) to evaluate the effectiveness of a multi-factorial, socio-medical fall prevention program among 1,894 community-resident elders in Philadelphia; 2.) to present the data from a replicative study among 1,053 identically selected and identically treated elders. Methods: In study #1, a random sample of Medicaid-eligible seniors, geographically representative of Philadelphia County’s dual-eligible, was selected using a geographic density procedure by zip code. Subjects participated in informational workshops, non-invasive somatic fall risk factor analysis, HIPPA compliant sharing of risk reports with physicians and pharmacists, in-home environmental fall risk analysis, pre- and post-fall counseling, and periodic safety grams. The treatment group was compared with two (2) large scale control groups for: a.) reduced hospitalizations for all injurious falls; and 2b) reduced hospitalization for fall-caused fractures. In study #2, 1,054 community-resident elders were selected via similar procedures and accorded to identical arrays of interventions. Results: In study #1, using Medicaid claims data, the treatment group was shown to have significantly fewer instances of healthcare utilization due to injurious falls compared to the control groups (p < 0.05): hospitalizations for fractures were 55% lower and hospitalizations for all fall-caused injuries were 65% lower. In study #2, participants who accepted all offered interventions were 400% less likely to suffer a self-reported fall than were non-participants. Conclusions: Multi-disciplinary, socio-medical fall prevention programs for community-resident elders can significantly reduce healthcare utilization due to injurious falls.

Keywords:
elderly falling economic benefit fall prevention

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