American Journal of Public Health Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-669X ISSN (Online): 2327-6703 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajphr Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
Open Access
Journal Browser
Go
American Journal of Public Health Research. 2016, 4(2), 62-68
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-4-2-4
Open AccessArticle

Black Fever among the Ethnic Santal People in Bangladesh

Md. Yeamin Ali1, Md. Fakrul Islam2, Md. Redwanur Rahman1, , kazi Robiul Alom3, Md. Liton Hossen3, Atiqur Rahman4, Mahfuza Khanom Sheema1, Jesmin Akhtar1, Akib Javed5 and Mst. Rupali Akhtar6

1Institute of Environmental Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

2Department of Social Work, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

3Department of Anthropology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

4Department of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

5Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

6Department of Political Science, University of Rajshahi, Rajshahi, Bangladesh

Pub. Date: March 29, 2016

Cite this paper:
Md. Yeamin Ali, Md. Fakrul Islam, Md. Redwanur Rahman, kazi Robiul Alom, Md. Liton Hossen, Atiqur Rahman, Mahfuza Khanom Sheema, Jesmin Akhtar, Akib Javed and Mst. Rupali Akhtar. Black Fever among the Ethnic Santal People in Bangladesh. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2016; 4(2):62-68. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-4-2-4

Abstract

The study tries to find out the scenario of black fever among the Santal people in Bangladesh. Santal patient health seeking behaviors related with their community people decision, free treatment consideration, preferable healthcare option. Those the entire thing is related with culture. The study is explorative and to some extent descriptive in nature that enforces to adopt mixed with qualitative and quantitative data as well as secondary and primary data. Research shows that 81% patient depend too much on treatment of indigenous physician (Kabiraj). Also barriers of accessing health care are the prevailing factor for health seeking behavior. 92% respondents said awareness and knowledge regarding black fever has too much impact. 43% people are influenced by church and Non-Governmental Organization (N.G.O) during decision making regarding treatment. 54% patients state that, skin turns into more black after taking medicine. Economic condition of lower class people has too much impact on health seeking behavior also. Santal people traditional practice is responsible attacked by black fever. If we will able to conscious ethnic people, dying and suffering regarding black fever will dissolve.

Keywords:
Health Seeking Behavior (HSB) Black fever ethnic Santal people treatment

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Figures

Figure of 2

References:

[1]  WHO, Second WHO report on NTDs, World Health Organization, Chapter 3.9, 2013, 67-71.
 
[2]  Desjeux, P., “Human leishmaniases: epidemiology and public health aspects”. World health statistics quarterly. Rapport trimestriel de statistiques sanitaires mondiales 45, no. 2-3, 1991, 267-275.
 
[3]  Bern, C., Allen W.H., Chowdhury R., Ali M., Amann J., Wagatsuma Y, Haque R. et al. “Risk factors for kala-azar in Bangladesh”. Risk, 2005.
 
[4]  WHO, TDR (Tropical Diseases Research) Report, 2012, World Health Organization
 
[5]  Singh, R. K., H. P. Pandey, and S. Sundar, “Visceral leishmaniasis (kala-azar): challenges ahead”. Indian Journal of Medical Research 123, no. 3, 2006. 331.
 
[6]  WHO, Second WHO report on NTDs, World Health Organization, Chapter 3.9, 2013, 67-71.
 
[7]  Status of endemicity of visceral leishmaniasis, worldwide, International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research (icddr,b), 2012.
 
[8]  Desjeux, P. “The increase in risk factors for leishmaniasis worldwide”, Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 95, no. 3, 2001, 239-243.
 
[9]  WHO, TDR (Tropical Diseases Research) Report, 2012, World Health Organization.
 
[10]  Alvar, J., Iván D.V., Bern C., Herrero M., Desjeux P., Cano J., Jannin J. and Boer M., “Leishmaniasis worldwide and global estimates of its incidence”, PloS one 7, no. 5, 2012, e35671.
 
[11]  WHO, Health Bulletin, World Health Organization, Chapter 9, 2012, 102-104.
 
[12]  Jorge A., Vélez I.D., Bern C., Herrero M., Desjeux P., Cano J., Jannin J., and Boer M., “Leishmaniasis worldwide and global estimates of its incidence”, PloS one 7, no. 5, 2012, e35671.
 
[13]  Ahmed, B., Nabi S.G., Rahman M., Selim S., Bashar A., Rashid M, Lira F.Y., Choudhury T.A., and Mondal D.. “Kala-azar (visceral leishmaniasis) elimination in Bangladesh: successes and challenges”. Current Tropical Medicine Reports 1, no. 3, 2014, 163-169.
 
[14]  The daily Sonali Sangbad, July 29, 2004.
 
[15]  http://old.himalmag.com/component/content/article/1750-the-poor-mans-disease.html, retrived at 27th November, 2015.
 
[16]  Surendran, S. N., Kajatheepan A., and Ramasamy R., “Socio-environmental factors and sandfly prevalence in Delft Island, Sri Lanka: implications for leishmaniasis vector control”, Journal of vector borne diseases 44, no. 1, 2007, 65.
 
[17]  Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics, BBS, 2011
 
[18]  Pearson, R.D., and Sousa A.Q., “Clinical spectrum of leishmaniasis”, Clinical Infectious Diseases, 1996, 1-11.
 
[19]  Fernando, R.L., Fernando S., and Leong A., “Tropical infectious diseases: epidemiology, investigation, diagnosis and management.” Cambridge University Press, 2001.
 
[20]  Allen E. and Seaman C.A., “Likert Scales and Data Analyses”, Quality Progress, 2007, 40(7), 2007, 64-65.
 
[21]  Godfrey-Faussett P., Kaunda H., Kamanga J., Beers S.V, Cleeff, M.V., Kumwenda-Phiri R., and Tihon V., “Why do patients with a cough delay seeking care at Lusaka urban health centres? A health systems research approach”, The International Journal of Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, vol. 6, 2002, 796-805.