American Journal of Public Health Research
ISSN (Print): 2327-669X ISSN (Online): 2327-6703 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajphr Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
Open Access
Journal Browser
Go
American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015, 3(5A), 130-134
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-3-5A-28
Open AccessResearch Article

Bridging Gaps in Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program at Bankura District, West Bengal State, India

Tapas Kumar Roy1, Gautam Sarker2, Avishek Gupta3, Shinjini Ghosh4, Debabrata Sarbapalli5 and Ranabir Pal6

1Medical Officer, Blood Bank, Deben Mahata Sadar Hospital, Purulia,West Bengal , India

25Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

3Department of Community Medicine, Midnapur Medical College, West Bengal, India

4Department of Community Medicine, MGM, Medical College & LSK Hospital, Kishanganj, Bihar, India

5Pro Vice Chancellor, West Bengal University of Health Sciences, Kolkata, India

6Department of Community Medicine and Family Medicine, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India

Pub. Date: October 28, 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Health Scenario 2015; Millennium Development Goals)

Cite this paper:
Tapas Kumar Roy, Gautam Sarker, Avishek Gupta, Shinjini Ghosh, Debabrata Sarbapalli and Ranabir Pal. Bridging Gaps in Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program at Bankura District, West Bengal State, India. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015; 3(5A):130-134. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-5A-28

Abstract

Background: Tuberculosis distresses economically productive age groups and emerged as a noteworthy reason of global burden. Objectives: The study was undertaken to find the gaps at the level of patients, or health providers in implementing RNTCP and also find out the reasons therein. Methods: This study was carried out among all patients enrolled as pulmonary tuberculosis cases in DOTs register of Tuberculosis Unit (TU) of a tertiary care teaching institute in eastern India in the third quarter of the year 2011. Results: Majority of cases (56.61%) belonged to 35-54 years age group, male (75.47%), from rural areas (64.15%), literacy up to primary (47.18%). Sputum was examined in 75.47 percent cases within 2-3 weeks after onset of cough and 89.62 percent were found sputum positive. DOTs providers completed initial home visit up to 70.75 percent cases; 71.70 percent initiated treatment within seven days after diagnosis. Initial defaulter was in 28.30 percent of cases; Literacy status showed significant difference in timing of diagnosis, initiation of treatment. Significance of difference with and without BPL Card was noted in delay of diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Literacy status was significantly associated with both timing of diagnosis and initiation of treatment. Socio economic status was also found significantly associated with delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment. First contact with unqualified local practitioner with delay in advising sputum examination in Government health facility, long distances from facility, non-availability of drugs and staffs with refusal to supply drug, inconvenient timing of clinic, fear from social stigma and fear of side effects of drugs with long duration of treatment were cited as negative issues in treatment. Conclusion: Initiation and continuation of treatment of TB is related with socio-demographic correlates that needs counselling & motivation for early intervention.

Keywords:
defaulter initiation tuberculosis

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

References:

[1]  WHO Global Tuberculosis Report 2012. [online] [cited 19 April 2012] Available from: http://www.who.int/tb/publications/factsheet_global.pdf.
 
[2]  Chauhan. LS. RNTCP: Past and Future of TB Control Programme in India. J. Commun Dis 2006; 38(3):191-203.
 
[3]  Sen T.K, Das D.K, Saha S. Persistence of Gaps in Implementation of Revised National Tuberculosis Control Program in an area of West Bengal. Indian Journal of Public Health 2007; 51(4): 246-8.
 
[4]  Zaman FA, Sheikh S, Das KC, Zaman GS, Pal R. An epidemiological study of newly diagnosed sputum positive tuberculosis patients in Dhubri district, Assam, India and the factors influencing their compliance to treatment.J Nat Sc Biol Med 2014;5:415-20.
 
[5]  Ambe G, Lonnroth K, Dholakiya Y. Every Provider Counts: effect of a comprehensive public-private mix approach for TB control in a large metropolitan area in India. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2005; 9: 562-8.
 
[6]  Central TB Division (CTD), Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Nirman Bhavan, New Delhi. RNTCP modules for Medical officers. Treatment Services. Modules 3:7.
 
[7]  Central TB Division (CTD), Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India. Strategy document for the supervision and monitoring of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control programme. Delhi, India. 2005:4.
 
[8]  Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme - An Overview. Central TB Division, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, New Delhi [online] [cited May 21 2012] Available from: https://nrhmmis.nic.in/Notifications/ConcurEval/RNTCP%20presentation%20060209.pdf.
 
[9]  RNTCP Operational Research Agenda, 2009-2010. Interventions to improve treatment outcomes. Int J Tuberc Lung Dis 2004; 8:323-2.
 
[10]  Park K. Parkā€²s textbook of preventive and social medicine. Health Programmes in India: 23rd ed. Jabalpur: Banarasidas Bhanot Publishers 2015. P 427.
 
[11]  Tuberculosis India 2010. Annual Report of the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. New Delhi: Central Tuberculosis Division Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India; 2010.
 
[12]  Technical and operational guidelines for tuberculosis control, Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. New Delhi. Central Tuberculosis Division, Directorate General of Health Services, Ministry of Health & Family Welfare, Government of India, 2005.
 
[13]  Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme: Training Course for Programme Manager (Module 1-4) April-2011, pp. 3, 5, 21, 23, 101-5.
 
[14]  Kesarwani P, Gupta PK, Mishra CP, Kaushik A. Awareness about RNTCP in rural area of Varanasi, Indian J Prev Soc Med 2010; 41(3 & 4): 244-50.
 
[15]  Muniyandi M, Rajeswari R, Balasubramanian R, Narayanan PR. Socio-economic dimensions of tuberculosis control: Review of studies over two decades from Tuberculosis Research Centre. J Comm Dis. 2006; 38(3):204-15.
 
[16]  Nirupa C, Sudha G, Santha T. Evaluation of Directly Observed Treatment Providers in the Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. Indian J Tuberc 2005; 52:73-7.
 
[17]  Dhanvij P, Joshi R, Kalantri SP. Delay in diagnosis of Tuberculosis in patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital in rural Central India, J MGIMS 2009; 14 (2): 56-63.
 
[18]  Ananthakrrishnan. R, Jeyaraj. A, Palani.G, Sathiyeskaran. B.W.C, Socioeconomic Impact of TB on patients registered within RNTCP and their families in the year 2007, Chennai, India. Lung India 2012; 29(3): 221-6.
 
[19]  Exhaled breathe analysis in tuberculosis case detection: the new horizon. Nepal J Epidemiol 2013; 3(2): 243-4.