American Journal of Public Health Research
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American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015, 3(4), 122-127
DOI: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4-1
Open AccessArticle

Determinants of Intention to Use Post Partum Family Planning among Women Attending Immunization Clinic of a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria

Ajibola Idowu1, Samson Ayo Deji2, , Olumuyiwa Ogunlaja3 and Samuel Olalere Olajide4

1Department of Community Medicine, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, Nigeria

2Department of Epidemiology and Community Health, Faculty of Clinical Sciences, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti, Ekiti State, Nigeria

3Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo state, Nigeria

4Clinical services unit, AIDS Prevention Initiative in Nigeria, Ibadan Regional Office, Oyo State, Nigeria

Pub. Date: June 18, 2015

Cite this paper:
Ajibola Idowu, Samson Ayo Deji, Olumuyiwa Ogunlaja and Samuel Olalere Olajide. Determinants of Intention to Use Post Partum Family Planning among Women Attending Immunization Clinic of a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria. American Journal of Public Health Research. 2015; 3(4):122-127. doi: 10.12691/ajphr-3-4-1

Abstract

Background The period immediately after childbirth offer a window of opportunity for counseling and adoption of family planning. Little is currently known about intention of women particularly in Nigeria to adopt PPFP and factors associated with such intentions. Nevertheless, this information is vital to the design of strategies to increase the uptake of PPFP. Objectives: The study assessed the factors associated with the intention of women in south-west Nigeria to use post partum family planning (PPFP). Methodology: This cross-sectional study was carried out between September to November, 2014. Systematic sampling technique was employed to recruit 444 women attending immunization clinic of Bowen University Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Nigeria. A pre-tested questionnaire was used for data collection and data analysis was done using SPSS version 17. Chi-square test was used for bivariate analysis while binary logistic regression was used for multivariate analysis. Statistical significance was set at p <0.05. Result: Most (65.0%) of the respondents had intentions to use PPFP. Intention to use PPFP was significantly associated with respondents’ social class (AOR; 2.67, 95% C.I; 1.11-6.42), their age (AOR; 0.43, 95% CI; 0.20 – 0.91), their level of awareness about PPFP (AOR; 0.15, 95% C.I; 0.08-0.28) and their prior use of any family planning method (AOR; 4.48, 95%C.I; 2.61-7.69). Conclusion: Most women in the south western part of Nigeria had intention to adopt post partum family planning, thus family planning policies should be focused on women in their extended postpartum periods. To be very effective, such efforts should particularly target women in middle socio-economic class who are less than 30 years of age and those who had ever used any family planning method.

Keywords:
determinants post partum family planning intention

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