American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine
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American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2020, 8(3), 85-97
DOI: 10.12691/ajmsm-8-3-1
Open AccessArticle

Common Reasons for Drug Noncompliance in Patients Who Are Attending Outpatient Clinics in Prince Mansur Military Hospital, Taif

Naif A Alzahrani1, , Hassan Ali Alshehri2, Alaa M Alwagdani1, Bassam A Alzaidi1, Wejdan M Safar3, Abdulelah Abdulrahman A4 and Faris Ghazi Almatrafi5

1Family Medicine Resident, Taif, Saudi Arabian

2Lecturer, medical college, Taif University, Saudi Arabian

3General Practitioner, Alhada military hospital, Taif, Saudi Arabian

44th year medical student at Taif University, Saudi Arabian

54th year pharmacy student at Umm Al Qura University, Saudi Arabian

Pub. Date: June 27, 2020

Cite this paper:
Naif A Alzahrani, Hassan Ali Alshehri, Alaa M Alwagdani, Bassam A Alzaidi, Wejdan M Safar, Abdulelah Abdulrahman A and Faris Ghazi Almatrafi. Common Reasons for Drug Noncompliance in Patients Who Are Attending Outpatient Clinics in Prince Mansur Military Hospital, Taif. American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2020; 8(3):85-97. doi: 10.12691/ajmsm-8-3-1

Abstract

Background: Barriers to medication adherence in patients can have significant differences that made researchers confute to conclude that medication adherence is required to be more explored, and then, beneficial interventions develop to decrease these barriers. Some of the main barriers to patient compliance with pharmacological therapy the barriers to medication adherence included four concepts, namely, lifestyle challenges, patient incompatibility, forgetting of medicine use, and no expert advice. These concepts are always present in the disease process and reduce the patients' efforts to achieve normal living and adhere to the medication. Medication non-adherence when patients do not take their medications as prescribed is unfortunately fairly common, especially among patients with chronic disease. Most non-adherence is intentional patients make a rational decision not to take their medicine based on their knowledge, experience and beliefs there are many reasons for non-compliance with in patients for medication. Barriers to medication adherence in patients can have significant differences that made researchers confute to conclude that medication adherence is required to be more explored, and then, beneficial interventions develop to decrease these barriers. Aim of the study: To investigate the reasons of drug noncompliance among patients who are attending out patients clinics in Prince Mansur military hospital. Method: Cross sectional study conducted at outpatient clinics in Prince Mansur military hospital, Taif city. Sample population consists of Saudi out patients aged 20-70 years attending to outpatient clinics in Prince Mansur military hospital. Our total participants were (250). Results: Majority of the study suffer from chronic diseases (82.3%) the Diabetes, hypertension, high fat and cholesterol were their percentage was respectively (54.7%, 48.6% and 31.2%) not heave chronic diseases (17.7%). Conclusion: There are numerous studies on Common reasons for drug noncompliance in patients over the years the factors related to compliance may be better categorized as factors as the approach in countering their effects may differ. The study also highlights that the interaction of the various factors has not been studied systematically. Future studies need to address this interaction issue, as this may be crucial to reducing the level of non-compliance in general, and to enhancing the possibility of achieving the desired healthcare outcomes. Drug noncompliance not only includes patient compliance with medication but many factors for example also with diet, exercise, or life style changes.

Keywords:
common reasons drug noncompliance patients attending outpatient clinics hospital

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