American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine
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American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2018, 6(2), 51-56
DOI: 10.12691/ajmsm-6-2-7
Open AccessArticle

Associated Factors of Conduct Disorder among School Students

Khalid Abdullah Mansor1, Nawaf Mutiq Alharbi2, Majed Abdullah Almasoudi3, , Waleed Saad Al Saeedi3, Sultan Khlifa Mohammad Althubiani4, Sultan Salem Algothami3, Fahed Abdullah Almasoudi3, Awad Mabrek Al Mutary5 and Muhannad Ali Alqahtani3

1Consultant Family Medicine, Hospital, Makka, Saudi Arabia kingdom

2Specialist Nursing, Hospital, Makka, Saudi Arabia kingdom

3Health Care Management Specialist, Hospital, Makka, Saudi Arabia kingdom

4Health & Hospital Administration Specialist, Hospital, Makka, Saudi Arabia kingdom

5Public Health Specialist, Hospital, Makka, Saudi Arabia kingdom

Pub. Date: December 10, 2018

Cite this paper:
Khalid Abdullah Mansor, Nawaf Mutiq Alharbi, Majed Abdullah Almasoudi, Waleed Saad Al Saeedi, Sultan Khlifa Mohammad Althubiani, Sultan Salem Algothami, Fahed Abdullah Almasoudi, Awad Mabrek Al Mutary and Muhannad Ali Alqahtani. Associated Factors of Conduct Disorder among School Students. American Journal of Medical Sciences and Medicine. 2018; 6(2):51-56. doi: 10.12691/ajmsm-6-2-7

Abstract

Background: Conduct disorder is a common childhood psychiatric problem that has an increased incidence in adolescence. It is defined as a pattern of repetitive behavior where the basic right of others or social norms or rules is violated. CD increases the risk of several public health problems (violence, weapon use, teenage pregnancy, substance abuse and dropping out of school). During reviewing the literature in this subject, the researcher found only one local study conducted in KSA among Bahrah secondary school students in 2008 and the prevalence was 66.8%. Objectives: Evaluate the associated factors of conduct disorder among male secondary school students in Al-Aziziah, Makkah, 2009. Methods: A cross-sectional study including a random sample of male secondary school students in Aziziah, Makkah. Data collected through aquestionnaire consisting of two parts: the first part containing demographic data and the second part containing conduct disorder rating scale based on DSM-IV criteria. Those who had 3 or more positive items were defined as having conduct disorder. Results: Conduct disorder increased with advancing student age. Thecause of the father absenteeism was the important factor that affects the changes in the prevalence of conduct disorders in the sons of the dead fathers who were lower compared to those whom fathers were absent for other causes as frequent absenteeism, polygamy or separation from the mothers. Conclusions: The conduct disorder among male secondary school students in Aziziah, Makkah is associated with significant negative consequences that could alter the quality of life. Conduct disorders present a significant public health problem for both the individual and the economy.

Keywords:
associated factor disorder school students

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