American Journal of Medical Case Reports
ISSN (Print): 2374-2151 ISSN (Online): 2374-216X Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajmcr Editor-in-chief: Samy, I. McFarlane
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American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2017, 5(8), 226-228
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-5-8-6
Open AccessCase Report

Sub-acute Sclerosing Pan-encephalitis in a 5 Years Old Child: A Response to Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Steroids

Al Shehhi. Wafaa1, Alkindi. Hanan2, Macki. Nabil1 and AL Hashami. Hilal3,

1Pediatric Neurology, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman

2Virology Department, National Public health lab, Muscat, Oman

3Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman

Pub. Date: August 28, 2017

Cite this paper:
Al Shehhi. Wafaa, Alkindi. Hanan, Macki. Nabil and AL Hashami. Hilal. Sub-acute Sclerosing Pan-encephalitis in a 5 Years Old Child: A Response to Intravenous Immunoglobulin and Steroids. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2017; 5(8):226-228. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-5-8-6

Abstract

A five years old Yemeni boy presented with a 5 months history of progressive neurological deterioration in picture of progressive cognitive decline , seizures and hyperkinetic movements. Patient came from an area with political instability and low socio-economic status. There was history suggestive of measles at 2 years of age. He never received measles vaccination. Diagnosis of sub acute sclerosing pan encephalitis (SSPE) was made based on clinical symptoms, serum and CSF findings of high measles IgG, neuroradiological findings as well as neurophysiological findings. We report this case to highlight the role of intravenous immunoglobulin and steroid in improving his symptoms.

Keywords:
subacute sclerosing pan encephalitis children intravenous immunoglobulin and steroids

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