American Journal of Medical Case Reports
ISSN (Print): 2374-2151 ISSN (Online): 2374-216X Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajmcr Editor-in-chief: Samy, I. McFarlane
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American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2016, 4(7), 245-247
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-4-7-8
Open AccessCase Report

Hyperglycemia Induced Reversible Hemiballismus as the Main Presentation of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus

Waseem Zaid Alkilani1, Hassan Tahir1, , Nathan Gibb1, Saad Ullah1 and Nagadarshini Ramagiri Vinod1

1Department of Internal Medicine, Temple University/Conemaugh Memorial Hospital, Johnstown, PA 15905, USA

Pub. Date: August 06, 2016

Cite this paper:
Waseem Zaid Alkilani, Hassan Tahir, Nathan Gibb, Saad Ullah and Nagadarshini Ramagiri Vinod. Hyperglycemia Induced Reversible Hemiballismus as the Main Presentation of Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Mellitus. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2016; 4(7):245-247. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-4-7-8

Abstract

Diabetes Mellitus commonly presents as polyuria, polydipsia, fatigue and polyphagia, though patients presenting with acute complications at the time of diagnosis are not uncommon. Stroke and neuropathies are the most common neurological complications of diabetes. Movement disorder like chorea and hemiballismus are very rarely associated with diabetes mellitus. Primary care physicians should be aware of these rare and complicit presentation of diabetes. We present a case of nonketotic hyperglycemic hemiballismus (NHH) with no acute abnormality seen on MRI brain.

Keywords:
hemiballismus hyperglycemia nonketotic hemichorea/hemiballismus

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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