American Journal of Medical Case Reports
ISSN (Print): 2374-2151 ISSN (Online): 2374-216X Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajmcr Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
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American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2019, 7(8), 180-183
DOI: 10.12691/ajmcr-7-8-8
Open AccessCase Report

Bladder Distension: An Overlooked Cause Vagal-induced Hypotension during Coronary Angiography

Mohammed Al-Sadawi1, Arismendy Nunez Garcia2, Muhammad Ihsan2, Erdal Cavusoglu2 and Samy I. McFarlane1,

1Department of Internal Medicine, State University of New York: Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States-11203

2Department of Cardiology, State University of New York: Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, United States-11203

Pub. Date: July 14, 2019

Cite this paper:
Mohammed Al-Sadawi, Arismendy Nunez Garcia, Muhammad Ihsan, Erdal Cavusoglu and Samy I. McFarlane. Bladder Distension: An Overlooked Cause Vagal-induced Hypotension during Coronary Angiography. American Journal of Medical Case Reports. 2019; 7(8):180-183. doi: 10.12691/ajmcr-7-8-8

Abstract

Hypotension is a common complication during coronary angiography. Multiple factors can lead to hypotension in cath lab including bleeding and vasovagal reaction. Vagal induced hypotension is commonly associated with severe pain and anxiety. However, other causes of hypotension in cath lab should be considered. Here we present a case of 76-year-old male was brought for coronary angiography and the procedure was complicated by hypotension from an overlooked bladder distention.

Keywords:
Coronary Angiography Coronary Angiography Complication Hypotension Vagal-induced Hypotension

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