American Journal of Food Science and Technology
ISSN (Print): 2333-4827 ISSN (Online): 2333-4835 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajfst Editor-in-chief: Hyo Choi
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American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2017, 5(5), 176-181
DOI: 10.12691/ajfst-5-5-2
Open AccessArticle

Evaluation of the Nutritional, Phytochemical and Antioxidant Properties of the Peels of Some Selected Mango Varieties

John O. Onuh1, , Gideon Momoh1, Simeon Egwujeh1 and Felicia Onuh2

1Department of Food, Nutrition & Home Sciences, Kogi State University, Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

2Department of Food Science and Technology, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria

Pub. Date: September 21, 2017

Cite this paper:
John O. Onuh, Gideon Momoh, Simeon Egwujeh and Felicia Onuh. Evaluation of the Nutritional, Phytochemical and Antioxidant Properties of the Peels of Some Selected Mango Varieties. American Journal of Food Science and Technology. 2017; 5(5):176-181. doi: 10.12691/ajfst-5-5-2

Abstract

Peels of 3 varieties of mango (Julie, Peter and Paparanda) were evaluated to determine the effects of varietal differences on the nutritional, phytochemical and antioxidant properties of peels of the selected varieties. Peels from moderately ripe mango fruits were processed into mango peel flour and analyzed for their nutritional, phytochemical and antioxidant properties. The results showed that mango varieties significantly differ from each other in their nutritional compositions. Peter variety had significantly highest values in both vitamins A (β-carotene) and C while Paparanda variety had significantly lowest values. Beta-carotene content of mango peels significantly ranged from 9.14 to 11.98 µg/g while the vitamin C content ranged from 21.66 µg/g to 51.54 µg/g. There is also great variation in the phytochemical compositions of the peels of the different varieties suggesting that they might have bioactive and functional properties. DPPH scavenging activities of the mango peels are significantly different from each and are also concentration dependent. They correlated with the vitamin C and polyphenolic content. Mango peels could therefore offer low-cost dietary supplements for low income groups as well as serve as potential source of functional ingredient in processed foods for the control, management and treatment of oxidative stress induced health disorders.

Keywords:
mango peels varieties nutritional phytochemicals antioxidant bioactive

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