American Journal of Food and Nutrition
ISSN (Print): 2374-1155 ISSN (Online): 2374-1163 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajfn Editor-in-chief: Mihalis Panagiotidis
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American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2014, 2(2), 18-22
DOI: 10.12691/ajfn-2-2-1
Open AccessArticle

Shelf Space Devoted to Nutritious Foods Correlates with BMI

Mackenzie Norman1, , Jordan Hoffmann1 and Lawrence J. Cheskin1

1Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, 21218, USA; Mackenzie Norman

Pub. Date: May 13, 2014

Cite this paper:
Mackenzie Norman, Jordan Hoffmann and Lawrence J. Cheskin. Shelf Space Devoted to Nutritious Foods Correlates with BMI. American Journal of Food and Nutrition. 2014; 2(2):18-22. doi: 10.12691/ajfn-2-2-1

Abstract

Obesity continues to be a threat to global health. The goal of this study was to examine the correlation between shelf space devoted to various categories of food and BMI in a variety of nations. A total of 121 supermarkets in 10 different countries were evaluated by taking linear measurements of shelf space devoted to 8 categories of foods, and assessing whether there was any relationship to mean population BMI. Trends were detected for the following food categories: 1. higher percent shelf space devoted to fresh vegetables, fresh fruit, canned vegetables, and canned fruit were all associated with a lower national BMI; 2. higher percent shelf space devoted to cereals/pastas/grains/bread, junk food and dairy showed a trend to higher national BMI. Percent supermarket shelf space devoted to healthful foods across 10 different countries correlated with lower BMI ranking by WHO statistics; percent shelf space of grains, dairy and junk food was different for each country and showed a positive trend with BMI. Supermarket shelf space use can offer insight into a country’s BMI, and represents a potential intervention avenue for positive health impact. Further work is needed to confirm this correlation in other nations, regions, and socioeconomic and demographic categories within nations.

Keywords:
obesity food environment BMI supermarket shelf space

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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