American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
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American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2014, 2(2), 63-65
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-2-2-3
Open AccessArticle

Strongyloides stercoralis Infestation in Indigenous Tapirapé Ethnic Group from Mato Grosso State, Brazil

Malheiros A.F.1, 2, , Mathews P.D.3, Lemos L.M.S4, Vianna D.V.4, Braga G. B.5 and Shaw J.J.6

1Department of Biological Science, University of State of Mato Grosso, Av. São João, S/n, Campus Universitário, Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brazil

2Department of Nursing, University of State of Mato Grosso, Av. São João, S/n, Campus Universitário, Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brazil;Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, São Paulo Brazil

3Department of Parasitology, Institute of Animal Biology, University of Campinas, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil

4Department of Nursing, University of State of Mato Grosso, Av. São João, S/n, Campus Universitário, Cáceres, Mato Grosso, Brazil

5Department of Preventive Veterinary Medicine and Animal Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, Av. Prof. Orlando Marques de Paiva, São Paulo, Brazil

6Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of Sao Paulo, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, São Paulo Brazil

Pub. Date: April 07, 2014

Cite this paper:
Malheiros A.F., Mathews P.D., Lemos L.M.S, Vianna D.V., Braga G. B. and Shaw J.J.. Strongyloides stercoralis Infestation in Indigenous Tapirapé Ethnic Group from Mato Grosso State, Brazil. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2014; 2(2):63-65. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-2-2-3

Abstract

Strongyloides stercoralis is an intestinal helminth, which infects millions of people worldwide. In the present study, 542 individuals from six indigenous villages were enrolled of whom 24 (4.43 %) were positive for S. stercoralis based on analysis by microscopy of fecal concentrates. S. stercoralis was more prevalent in males (5.32 %, 14/263) than females (3.58 %, 10/279), though without a significant statistic difference (P = 0.66). Likewise, the infection by S. stercoralis could not be related to age of the indigenous (P > 0.05). This study is the first report of the prevalence of S. stercoralis in members of the indigenous Tapirapé ethnic group from the Brazilian Amazon. The results suggest a contamination by infective forms of S. stercoralis in the environment where these indigenous live.

Keywords:
Strongyloides stercoralis prevalence indigenous people Brazilian Amazon

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