American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease
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American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2014, 2(2), 60-62
DOI: 10.12691/ajeid-2-2-2
Open AccessArticle

Impact Factor of Published Clinical Trials in the Field of Pediatric Infectious Diseases

Adi Klein-Kremer1, 2, , Francis B. Mimouni3, 4 and Ronnie Stein1

1Department of Pediatrics, Hillel Yaffe Medical Center, Hadera, Israel

2Faculty of Medicine, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel

3Dana Duek Children’s Hospital, Tel-Aviv Medical Center, Tel-Aviv, Israel

4Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel

Pub. Date: March 31, 2014

Cite this paper:
Adi Klein-Kremer, Francis B. Mimouni and Ronnie Stein. Impact Factor of Published Clinical Trials in the Field of Pediatric Infectious Diseases. American Journal of Epidemiology and Infectious Disease. 2014; 2(2):60-62. doi: 10.12691/ajeid-2-2-2

Abstract

Impact Factor (IF) is used for evaluating journals; it represents a measure of the average frequency with which an article in a specific journal is cited by other articles in a given period of time. In a previous report we showed that in Neonatology, clinical trials published between 1998 and 2003 were more likely to be published in journals with lower IF had they reported negative results (NR) vs. positive results (PR). This study aimed at determining which biases exist in clinical trials in the field of Pediatric Infectious Diseases; we tested the effect of 5 factors on the likelihood of an article to be published in a high vs. low IF journal: NR vs. PR, sample size, study design (prospective, randomized, double-blinded), funding source, and originating region of the report. We selected articles of clinical trials in the field of Pediatric Infectious Diseases registered in MEDLINE from 2007 to 2011. We recorded the aforementioned factors and the IF of each journal, corresponding to publication year. Trends over time and the differences between studies with NR or PR were examined. IF and sample size were not significantly higher in PR vs. NR studies. Conversely, the aforementioned study design elements produced publications in journals of significantly higher IF. IF increased respectively with the following funding source categories: (i) no source stated; (ii) pharmaceutical company; (iii) non-US competitive; (iv) US national agency (non-NIH); (iv) NIH. Pediatric Infectious Diseases articles with NR vs. PR are not more likely to be published in journals with lower IF. Also, no apparent relationship exists between sample size and IF. Factors associated with the quality of the study, namely design and source of funding, may be more related to the IF of the journal than the type of results reported therein.

Keywords:
impact factor negative results positive results clinical trials Pediatric infectious diseases

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References:

[1]  Introducing the impact factor: http://thomsonreuters.com/journal-citation-reports/ (Last accessed on July 24, 2013).
 
[2]  European Association of Science Editors (EASE) Statement on Inappropriate Use of Impact Factors. http://www.ease.org.uk/publications/impact-factor-statement (Last accessed on July 24, 2013).
 
[3]  Littner Y, Mimouni FB, Dollberg S, et al. Negative results and impact factor: a lesson from neonatology. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2005; 159: 1036-1037.
 
[4]  Easterbrook, PJ, Berlin JA, Gopalan R, et al. Publication bias in clinical research. Lancet. 1991; 337: 867-872.