American Journal of Cancer Prevention
ISSN (Print): 2328-7314 ISSN (Online): 2328-7322 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajcp Editor-in-chief: Nabil Abdel-Hamid
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American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2017, 5(4), 46-52
DOI: 10.12691/ajcp-5-4-1
Open AccessArticle

Breast Cancer Awareness and Approach toward Exposure to Diverse Patterns of Hormones among Women in Northern Saudi Arabia

Ibrahim A. Bin ahmed1, Saleh Hadi Alharbi1, Fayez Saud Alreshidi2, Sami Awejan Alrashedi2, Ali Ghannam Alrashidi2, Kalaf Jaze Kalaf Alshammeri2 and Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed2,

1Faculty of Medicine, Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA)

2College of Medicine, University of Hail, Hail, KSA

Pub. Date: November 27, 2017

Cite this paper:
Ibrahim A. Bin ahmed, Saleh Hadi Alharbi, Fayez Saud Alreshidi, Sami Awejan Alrashedi, Ali Ghannam Alrashidi, Kalaf Jaze Kalaf Alshammeri and Hussain Gadelkarim Ahmed. Breast Cancer Awareness and Approach toward Exposure to Diverse Patterns of Hormones among Women in Northern Saudi Arabia. American Journal of Cancer Prevention. 2017; 5(4):46-52. doi: 10.12691/ajcp-5-4-1

Abstract

Background: Several studies have well-established the relationship between breast cancer and etiological hormonal factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine breast cancer related awareness and approach toward exposure to diverse patterns of hormones among women in Northern Saudi Arabia. Methodology: This is a cross sectional survey included 400 Saudi females’ volunteers living in the city of Hail, Northern Saudi Arabia. Knowledge, awareness and approach toward exposure to diverse patterns of hormones and breast cancer risk were evaluated using different variables during interview. Results: On asking the participants the question “Does the over exposure to hormones (ER) increases the risk of breast cancer” Out of 387 respondents, 47.5% answered yes increases the risk of breast cancer. On asking the participants the question “Does early puberty and late menopause increase the risk of breast cancer” Out of 395 respondents, 35.2% answered yes increases the risk of breast cancer. Conclusion: Knowledge of hormonal breast cancer risk factors is not so strong so as to achieve the intended values in Northern Saudi Arabia. Knowledge of breast cancer risk factors can powerfully participate to the breast cancer prevention struggles, which will have the chief results mainly if started at an early age and continued over a lifetime.

Keywords:
breast cancer Awareness risk factors hormones Saudi Arabia

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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