American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture
ISSN (Print): 2328-398X ISSN (Online): 2328-3998 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajcea Editor-in-chief: Mohammad Arif Kamal
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American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture. 2014, 2(1), 53-59
DOI: 10.12691/ajcea-2-1-6
Open AccessArticle

Correlation between Engineering Stress-Strain and True Stress-Strain Curve

Iman Faridmehr1, Mohd Hanim Osman1, , Azlan Bin Adnan2, Ali Farokhi Nejad2, Reza Hodjati1 and Mohammadamin Azimi1

1Faculty of Civil Engineering, Universiti Teknologi, Malaysia, Skudai, Johor. Malaysia

2Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi, Malaysia, Skudai, Johor. Malaysia

Pub. Date: March 05, 2014

Cite this paper:
Iman Faridmehr, Mohd Hanim Osman, Azlan Bin Adnan, Ali Farokhi Nejad, Reza Hodjati and Mohammadamin Azimi. Correlation between Engineering Stress-Strain and True Stress-Strain Curve. American Journal of Civil Engineering and Architecture. 2014; 2(1):53-59. doi: 10.12691/ajcea-2-1-6

Abstract

The most commonly accepted method in evaluation of the mechanical properties of metals would be the tension test. Its main objective would be to determine the properties relevant to the elastic design of machines and structures. Investigation of the engineering and true Stress-strain relationships of three specimens in conformance with ASTM E 8 – 04 is the aim of this paper. For the purpose of achieving this aim, evaluation of values such as ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, percentage of elongation and area reduction, fracture strain and Young's Modulus was done once the specimens were subjected to uniaxial tensile loading. The results indicate that the properties of steel materials are independent from their thickness and they generally yield and fail at the same stress and strain values. Also, it is concluded that the maximum true stress values are almost 15% higher than that of the maximum engineering stress values while the maximum true strain failure values are 1.5% smaller than the maximum engineering strain failure values.

Keywords:
tension testing mechanical properties of metals stress-strain relationships uniaxial tensile

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References:

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[4]  Standard Test Methods for Mechanical Testing of Steel Products-Metric ASTM A 1058b, 2012, DIN Deutsches Institut für Normung e. V.
 
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