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Article

Enhancing Teaching Competency of Graduate Teacher Trainees through Metacognitive Intervention Strategies

1Alagappa University College of Education, Karaikudi, Tamil Nadu, South India

2Bharath College of Education, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, South India

3Center for Research in Education, Thava Thiru Kundrakudi Adigalar College Campus, Kundrakudi, Tamil Nadu, South India


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(1), 27-32
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-5
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
M. Parimala Fathima, N. Sasikumar, M. Panimalar Roja. Enhancing Teaching Competency of Graduate Teacher Trainees through Metacognitive Intervention Strategies. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(1):27-32. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-5.

Correspondence to: N.  Sasikumar, Bharath College of Education, Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu, South India. Email: sasismile25@gmail.com

Abstract

Teacher competencies facilitate physical, intellectual, social, and emotional development of the students. The teaching competency of a teacher is determined by various aspects. In this study, the investigator developed teaching competency on five dimensions namely induction, content, pedagogy, organization and Assessment. The findings revealed that there is a continuous improvement in all the dimensions of teaching competency. It further shows that every teacher needs to review/update his/her potential in all possible novel/new/innovative strategies, so as to modify and improve his/her teaching competency in accordance with the changes envisaged in the educational system. The investigator suggests that this experiment will definitely help the future teachers to take their roles confidently by enhancing the teaching competencies in the class room situation. Hence, there is an urgent need to steer our efforts towards the implementation of metacognitive intervention strategies to enhance teaching competencies at all levels of teacher education.

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Article

Optimism and Quality of Life after Renal Transplantation

1Institute of Applied Psychology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(1), 22-26
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-4
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fatima Kamran. Optimism and Quality of Life after Renal Transplantation. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(1):22-26. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-4.

Correspondence to: Fatima  Kamran, Institute of Applied Psychology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan. Email: fatimakamran24@yahoo.com

Abstract

Optimism is considered to influence Quality of Life (QoL) in a positive way. The longitudinal study was carried out to find the impact of optimism (life orientation) on perceived Quality of life among renal transplant recipients (RTRs) to see if optimism increases subjective QoL. The findings revealed a significant positive correlation between optimism and perceived QoL, suggesting that optimist recipients tend to be more satisfied with their overall life post- transplant. Recipients did not differ in levels of optimism on the basis of gender, marital status, education, financial conditions and time since transplantation. Age was the only demographic factor found to be negatively associated with optimism, suggesting that optimism decreases with increasing age. In order to clarify the cause & effect relationship, a linear regression was carried out that showed that optimism does not predict QoL; however, an increased QoL does predict optimism which is an interesting and unexpected finding. Optimism was studied as a personality trait; however, it appeared to be more as an outcome of life experiences. A Cross lagged Correlation analysis was carried out to clarify the causal direction of this relationship between optimism and QoL. However, no clear causal direction was found indicative of an overlap among these constructs which seem to lack distinctiveness as separate constructs.

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References

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Article

Climate Stress, Behavioral Adaptation and Subjective Well Being in Coastal Cities of India

1Faculty of HRM, Indian Institute of Forest Management, Bhopal, India

2Department of Psychology, Sant Hirdaram Girls College, Bhopal, India


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(1), 13-21
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-3
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Parul Rishi, Ruchi Mudaliar. Climate Stress, Behavioral Adaptation and Subjective Well Being in Coastal Cities of India. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(1):13-21. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-3.

Correspondence to: Parul  Rishi, Faculty of HRM, Indian Institute of Forest Management, Bhopal, India. Email: rishiparul@rediffmail.com

Abstract

India has been identified as one amongst 27 countries which are most vulnerable to the impacts of global warming related accelerated SLR (UNEP,1989). There is a perceived potential threat to coastal India owing to the vast sea-side development and huge populations in the vicinity of the coast. Therefore, there is a pressing need to address issues related to climate stress, adaptation, vulnerability and coping in coastal cities of India, especially from the psychological perspective. Climate change in coastal areas is associated much with flooding, SLR, land inundation, storms, cyclones etc. Coping with and adapting to climate stress are therefore issues of concern for experts worldwide. If environmental stressors persist chronically, they may lead to inner conflicts that can be psychologically disturbing for individuals and may even give rise to physiological, emotional, cognitive and behavioral changes. The established fact that anthropogenic factors account for one of the major contributors to climate change makes it necessary to probe into behavioral facets as in spite of the best possible efforts around the globe to combat climate change, it is felt that people are still not as seriously aware/ alarmed of the expected future risk as they should be. In view of above background, the present behavioral study to assess the cognitive understanding of climate change, climate stress and actions and reactions of coastal people with a special focus on behavioral adaptation and subjective well being was undertaken. The study was conducted on a sample of 150 males and female respondents mainly in four coastal cities of India namely Mumbai, Chennai, Daman and Pondicherry keeping in mind the coastal hazards and vulnerability issues associated with Indian coastal cities (TERI,1996). Especially designed Climate change perception Inventory (CCPI) based on a four-point Likert type rating scale format was used to assess the respondents’ Climate Change Awareness (CCA), Climate Stress and Emotional Concern (CSEC), Coping/Adaptation, Institutional Accountability (IA), and Coastal Subjective Well Being (CSWB). Results indicated a good level of CCA and subjective well being among coastal people. Respondents were found to be experiencing a moderate amount of climate stress and were unable to fully cope with it. They expected more efforts on the part of government and environmental institutions for adapting with climate change in coastal cities and suggested various adaptive strategies in this regard. Results were interpreted in line with article 6 of New Delhi Work Program of UNFCCC (2007) in which special effort to foster psychological/behavioral change has been stressed through public awareness.

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References

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Article

Living with a Kidney Transplant: Perceptions and Experiences

1Institute of Applied Psychology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan, University of Surrey, U.K


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014, 2(1), 5-12
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-2
Copyright © 2014 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Fatima Kamran. Living with a Kidney Transplant: Perceptions and Experiences. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2014; 2(1):5-12. doi: 10.12691/ajap-2-1-2.

Correspondence to: Fatima  Kamran, Institute of Applied Psychology, University of the Punjab, Lahore, Pakistan, University of Surrey, U.K. Email: fatimakamran24@yahoo.com

Abstract

The qualitative study was carried out as a part of a larger longitudinal study on renal transplant recipients (RTRs) following a successful transplant in Pakistan. The aim was to explore why recipients with similar physical health status and healthy kidney functioning, differ in perceptions of Quality of life. Using in depth interviews the study participants with the highest and lowest scores on a standardized QoL index were asked to describe their experiences and attributions regarding kidney failure and to describe their health status pre-and post-transplant. The themes emerging from the analysis related to individual differences in the ‘impact’ of transplant on ‘relationships’ with significant others, (family, work and social life) ‘self identity’, ‘social comparisons’, perceptions of ‘health care and medical professionals’, adjustment, acceptance and ‘coping’ with a transplant. The recipients with a positive perception in these aspects tend to report a more satisfied QoL.

Keywords

References

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