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Article

Climate Change Awareness: An Explorative Study on the Discursive Construction of Ethical Consumption in a Communication Campaign

1Department of Educational Sciences, Psychology and Communication, University of Bari, Italy


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 65-71
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-6
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Amelia Manuti. Climate Change Awareness: An Explorative Study on the Discursive Construction of Ethical Consumption in a Communication Campaign. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):65-71. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-6.

Correspondence to: Amelia  Manuti, Department of Educational Sciences, Psychology and Communication, University of Bari, Italy. Email: amelia.manuti@uniba.it

Abstract

The recent interest of the European Commission about the issues of ethical consumption and protection of the environment carried out the creation of Climate Change Awareness Campaign. The launch of the campaign was in 2006, throughout the 25 member states to raise awareness of climate change and the positive role that citizens can play in figuring it. There are strong indications, in several countries, that many consumers are switching towards more socially and environmentally responsible products and services, reflecting a shift in consumer values. The aim of this explorative study is to investigate the discursive construction of ethical awareness which would guide actual ethical consumption behaviour with reference to a communication campaign. Indeed, though scientific literature as already pointed out the efficacy of persuasive communication in social public campaign appealing at ethical issues, little is known about what happens between the fruition of the campaign and attitude and behavioural consumption. Participants to the study, a sample of university students were asked to examine one of the videos of the Climate Change Awareness Campaign promoted and broadcast by the European Commission, as to investigate their social representation of ethical consumption, arguing that this could act as interpretative repertoire of their attitude toward ethical consumption. Focus group discussion was used as methodological tool. Main results, implication and further development were discussed.

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References

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Article

Speed and Road Accidents: Behaviors, Motives, and Assessment of the Effectiveness of Penalties for Speeding

1DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (Traffic and Road Safety Institute), University of Valencia, Serpis, València, Spain

2METRAS Research Group (Measurement, Evaluation, Analysis, and Data Processing of Traffic Accidents and Road Safety). INTRAS, University of Valencia, Serpis, València, Spain


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 58-64
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-5
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Francisco Alonso, Cristina Esteban, Constanza Calatayud, Jaime Sanmartín. Speed and Road Accidents: Behaviors, Motives, and Assessment of the Effectiveness of Penalties for Speeding. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):58-64. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-5.

Correspondence to: Francisco  Alonso, DATS (Development and Advising in Traffic Safety) Research Group, INTRAS (Traffic and Road Safety Institute), University of Valencia, Serpis, València, Spain. Email: datspublications@gmail.com

Abstract

When dealing with the duality of mobility and safety, speed is one of the main factors causing deaths, so this is the reason why speed is one of the most studied topics related to road safety. The main objective of this research was to identify the aspects that modulate the speed-accidents relation. Specifically, the frequency and reasons why drivers speed. On the other hand, it was also considered the perception of drivers regarding the probability of penalty, the penalties imposed, and their severity. Finally, drivers’ opinion on the effectiveness of such penalty in order to change speeding behavior was also studied. A sample of 1,100 Spanish drivers over 14 years old and having any kind of driving license was used. The results showed that approximately the third part of drivers always or sometimes sped. Among the specific reasons, the hurry, not having noticed, that the limits are too low or that the conditions allow doing so were the most frequent. Likewise, drivers considered as limited the probability of being caught. Finally, more than half of the drivers considered that the penalty they received was appropriate. Moreover, half of the drivers that received a penalty claimed that they changed their speeding habits as a result of such penalty. Drivers who speed are completely aware of the fact that they are breaking the traffic rules. Their speeding behavior is intentional in 80% of the cases. They are not aware of the risks of speeding since they justified their behavior by saying the speed limits are too low, the conditions on the roads allow doing so, or that it was a habit.

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References

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Article

Comorbidity between Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among Adults: A Cross Cultural Comparison between India and Kuwait

1Counselor & Clinical Psychologist, Gulf University for Science & Technology, Mishref, Kuwait


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 49-57
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-4
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Siddiqa Najamuddin Mohammed Hussain. Comorbidity between Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) among Adults: A Cross Cultural Comparison between India and Kuwait. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):49-57. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-4.

Correspondence to: Siddiqa  Najamuddin Mohammed Hussain, Counselor & Clinical Psychologist, Gulf University for Science & Technology, Mishref, Kuwait. Email: hussain.s@gust.edu.kw

Abstract

A study conducted on two different samples of already diagnosed Borderline Personality Disorder (30 each) from two different countries (India & Kuwait) to examine the comorbidity between Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and Adult Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Clinical Anger, Impulsivity and Affective disorder are common symptoms shared by both the disorders. SPSS, Quantitative and Qualitative analyses are made.

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Article

Imperatives of Emotional Intelligence On Psychological Wellbeing among Adolescents

1Department of Management Sciences, Rhema University, Aba, Nigeria

2Department of Physical and Health Education, Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education, Owerri, Nigeria


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 44-48
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-3
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
John N. N. Ugoani, Meg. A. Ewuzie. Imperatives of Emotional Intelligence On Psychological Wellbeing among Adolescents. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):44-48. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-3.

Correspondence to: John N. N. Ugoani, Department of Management Sciences, Rhema University, Aba, Nigeria. Email: drjohnugoani@yahoo.com

Abstract

Psychological wellbeing is a stochastic phenomenon that can be meaningfully pursued through nondestructive behaviors epitomized by emotional intelligence (EI). Abnormal and normal behaviours mark the two ends of a continuum, and a person who is unable to function effectively in day-to-day life may be regarded as psychologically abnormal and far from a state of psychological wellbeing. Recent research has shown that children are growing lonely and depressed, more angry and unruly, more nervous and prone to worry, more impulsive and aggressive. And also that decline in EI among adolescents manifests in problems such as despair, alienation, drug abuse, crime and violence, bulling and dropping out of school. The survey research design was used for the study and it was found through statistical analyses that emotional intelligence influences psychological wellbeing among adolescents. Five recommendations were made based on the findings of the study.

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References

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Article

Effects of Music Genre and Music Language on Task Performance Among University of Botswana Students

1Department of Psychology University of Botswana Gaborone, Botswana


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 38-43
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-2
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Shyngle Kolawole Balogun, Nicole M. Monteiro, Tshephiso Teseletso. Effects of Music Genre and Music Language on Task Performance Among University of Botswana Students. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):38-43. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-2.

Correspondence to: Nicole M. Monteiro, Department of Psychology University of Botswana Gaborone, Botswana. Email: drnmonteiro@gmail.com

Abstract

Equivocality on the influence of music on task performance led to the present study investigating the effects of music genre and music language on task performance. Using 60 students who were randomly assigned to a 2 X 3 ANOVA design under two conditions of music genre (Pop, Gospel) and three music language conditions (English, French, Setswana), the students were asked to perform a cognitive/perceptual task. It was revealed that performance was generally poor among the students but worse of under French language, whether Pop or Gospel, followed by Setswana language; while performance was better with English Pop music. It was concluded that the genre and language selection of music that students use to study may significantly impact task performance. As students listen to their music devices, they may be advised to choose their songs wisely to facilitate optimal arousal, attention and mood for better performance.

Keywords

References

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Article

Motives for Lavish Funerals Among the Nembe People of the Niger Delta Region in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

1Department of Educational Foundations Guidance and Counseling Faculty of Education University of Calabar, Nigeria


American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013, 1(3), 33-37
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-1
Copyright © 2013 Science and Education Publishing

Cite this paper:
Rachel D. Uche. Motives for Lavish Funerals Among the Nembe People of the Niger Delta Region in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2013; 1(3):33-37. doi: 10.12691/ajap-1-3-1.

Correspondence to: Rachel D. Uche, Department of Educational Foundations Guidance and Counseling Faculty of Education University of Calabar, Nigeria. Email: riciuche@yahoo.com

Abstract

This study examined the motives for lavish funerals among the Nembe people located in the creeks of the Niger Delta in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. The ex-post facto design was employed. Using a non-probability quota technique, 120 respondents were sampled. A scale comprising three subscales: 1 Nembe Culture on Funerals, 2 Propensity for Lavish Funerals and 3 Love for the Deceased were constructed and used for data collection. In line with the two hypotheses formulated, the accruing data was analyzed using the Pearson Product Moment Correlation statistics. Results revealed that love for deceased family members and not the culture is the motive for lavish funeral. It is recommended that individuals be counseled to demonstrate such love through the establishment of foundations and other philanthropic gestures, to assist the less privileged in society, as memorials for loved ones who have gone on.

Keywords

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