American Journal of Applied Psychology
ISSN (Print): 2333-472X ISSN (Online): 2333-4738 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/ajap Editor-in-chief: Apply for this position
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American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2021, 9(1), 15-21
DOI: 10.12691/ajap-9-1-3
Open AccessReview Article

Inclusive Connecting Trigger in Cognitive Science of Creativity

Abhijit Manohar1,

1Kolhapur, Maharashtra, India

Pub. Date: September 02, 2021

Cite this paper:
Abhijit Manohar. Inclusive Connecting Trigger in Cognitive Science of Creativity. American Journal of Applied Psychology. 2021; 9(1):15-21. doi: 10.12691/ajap-9-1-3

Abstract

This research paper presents the cognitive scientific and neuro-scientific knowledge of creativity. It goes on to develop and propose an Inclusive Connecting Trigger (ICT) to improve the generation quality and generation time of candidate solutions. It also develops a preliminary mathematics for selecting the ICTs and the methods of choosing ICTs. It discusses the scope of ICT to a variety of creative domains. The Inclusive Connecting Trigger is demonstrated and supported by experiments performed and documented is this research paper.

Keywords:
inclusive connecting trigger involuntary memory remote association alternate uses fluency originality creativity intelligence

Creative CommonsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

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