Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences
ISSN (Print): 2328-3912 ISSN (Online): 2328-3920 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/aees Editor-in-chief: Alejandro González Medina
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Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2016, 4(3), 61-65
DOI: 10.12691/aees-4-3-2
Open AccessArticle

Important Gum Yielding Species Anogeissus latifolia (Roxb.) Bedd., Boswellia serrata Roxb. and Sterculia urens Roxb.: Ethnobotany, Population Density and Management

Chandra Prakash Kala1,

1Ecosystem & Environment Management, Indian Institute of Forest Management, Nehru Nagar, Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh, India

Pub. Date: August 17, 2016

Cite this paper:
Chandra Prakash Kala. Important Gum Yielding Species Anogeissus latifolia (Roxb.) Bedd., Boswellia serrata Roxb. and Sterculia urens Roxb.: Ethnobotany, Population Density and Management. Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2016; 4(3):61-65. doi: 10.12691/aees-4-3-2

Abstract

Natural gum is an important forest produce, which provides livelihood to the forest dwellers and also forms a vital raw material for various industries. India is one the major producers of gum as it endows with high diversity of gum yielding tree species. However, these tree species are less studied, especially with respect to their indigenous uses of gums, and also the existing information on gum yielding species are scattered. In this context, the present study aims to study three important gum yielding species such as Anogeissus latifolia (Roxb.) Bedd., Boswellia serrata Roxb. and Sterculia urens Roxb. with respect to their indigenous uses, harvesting practices, population density and management interventions. An extensive literature survey and fieldwork carried out in the central Indian states resulted in documentation of various indigenous uses of the selected species. The population density of Boswellia serrata and Sterculia urens was found extremely poor in the study area. Among all three gums yielding species Anogeissus latifolia obtains highest population density. The results of the study are further discussed with respect to the management and conservation of these important tree species..

Keywords:
natural gums and resins indigenous uses industrial applications harvesting practices management conservation

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