Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences
ISSN (Print): 2328-3912 ISSN (Online): 2328-3920 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/aees Editor-in-chief: Alejandro González Medina
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Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015, 3(4), 100-107
DOI: 10.12691/aees-3-4-2
Open AccessArticle

Capturing Traditional Practices of Rice Based Farming Systems and Identifying Interventions for Resource Conservation and Food Security in Tripura, India

Anup Das1, , GI Ramkrushna1, GS Yadav2, Jayanta Layek1, C Debnath2, BU Choudhury2, KP Mohaptara1, SV Ngachan1 and Supriya Das3

1ICAR Research Complex for NEH Region, Umiam, Meghalaya, India

2ICAR Research Complex for NEH region, Tripura Centre, Agartala, India

3Government Degree College, Dharmanagar, North Tripura, India

Pub. Date: July 29, 2015

Cite this paper:
Anup Das, GI Ramkrushna, GS Yadav, Jayanta Layek, C Debnath, BU Choudhury, KP Mohaptara, SV Ngachan and Supriya Das. Capturing Traditional Practices of Rice Based Farming Systems and Identifying Interventions for Resource Conservation and Food Security in Tripura, India. Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015; 3(4):100-107. doi: 10.12691/aees-3-4-2

Abstract

Entire livelihood of farmers in plains of Tripura is dependent on rice based farming systems (RBFS). A good rice crop brings smile to the family and locality and a poor crop brings misery and makes farmers debt ridden. Traditionally, about 5-10% of available farm area is given for water harvesting for life saving irrigation during dry season and most importantly for growing fish and domestic use. The water harvested in ponds is used for lifesaving irrigation of vegetables (15-20% farm area) fruits, etc. grown around rice fields or adjacent to home yards. Lowland rice fields and lungas (depressed area in between hills/lowlands) are major ecosystems for indigenous small fish species. The demand and taste of indigenous fish are much better than the improved fishes like Indian major carps, exotic carps etc. Rice ecosystem is also the major habitat for crabs, eels, edible snails, roots etc. that provides nutrition to thousands in northeastern region. Livestock like cattle, buffaloes, poultry etc. are the integral part of the RBFS. The animal component not only contributes to the manure stock and livelihood of small and marginal farmers but also empowers women and children. The fertility of rice fields are maintained over the centuries through efficient residue recycling, livestock penning, application of organic manure and composts etc. The strength of the indigenous RBFS is that there is hardly any case of starvation death or suicide in the state or in the region which is frequent news in other parts of the country. However, there is need for blending improved technologies and high yielding varieties/breeds to the indigenous RBFS for food security of the increasing population in the state similar to other parts of the country.

Keywords:
rice based farming systems ecological conservation livelihood traditional knowledge sustainability

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