Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences
ISSN (Print): 2328-3912 ISSN (Online): 2328-3920 Website: http://www.sciepub.com/journal/aees Editor-in-chief: Alejandro González Medina
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Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015, 3(1), 11-15
DOI: 10.12691/aees-3-1-3
Open AccessArticle

Photographic Identification of Individual Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens Cuvier, 1825)

Saroj Shrestha1, , Karan Bahadur Shah2, Damber Bista3 and Hem Sagar Baral4,

1Central Department of Environmental Science, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal

2Natural History Museum, Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal

3Red Panda Network, Kathmandu, Nepal

4Zoological Society of London, Nepal Office, Kathmandu, Nepal

Pub. Date: February 11, 2015

Cite this paper:
Saroj Shrestha, Karan Bahadur Shah, Damber Bista and Hem Sagar Baral. Photographic Identification of Individual Red Panda (Ailurus fulgens Cuvier, 1825). Applied Ecology and Environmental Sciences. 2015; 3(1):11-15. doi: 10.12691/aees-3-1-3

Abstract

This study was carried out to identify individual red panda (Ailurus fulgens) through photographs and develop a protocol for their identification from pelage patterns. Manual observation method for photo-identification was applied for matching natural markings and statistical tools like Kruskal-Wallis tests and Sensitivity and Specificity tests were used during the analysis. Out of the three different sections considered in the study, contribution of head section was recorded to be the most significant (77.33%) followed by tail (53.33%) and mid section (50.66%) for discriminating individual red panda. Similarly, head section’s contribution was remarkable (60%) in distinguishing juvenile and adult red panda. This study also helped reveal out some discriminating features in tail, ear, pelage-coloration, tear drop and patches of juvenile and adult red panda. Four major types of facial patterns (Bald, Murky, Faint and Shiny) and 12 morphological features including five primary and seven secondary features were recorded for identifying individual red panda.

Keywords:
individual identification invasive marking natural marking photo-identification red panda

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